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Kidney Week

Abstract: PO2243

Age-Stratified Sex Differences in the Risk of Cardiovascular Disease in Patients with CKD

Session Information

Category: Women’s Health and Kidney Diseases

  • 2000 Women’s Health and Kidney Diseases

Authors

  • Oh, Ester, University of Colorado Denver School of Medicine, Aurora, Colorado, United States
  • You, Zhiying, University of Colorado Denver School of Medicine, Aurora, Colorado, United States
  • Nowak, Kristen L., University of Colorado Denver School of Medicine, Aurora, Colorado, United States
  • Jovanovich, Anna, University of Colorado Denver School of Medicine, Aurora, Colorado, United States
Background

In the general population, females (vs. males) and younger individuals have a lower cardiovascular risk. However, little is known whether this age- and sex-specific risk pattern of cardiovascular disease (CVD) translates to individuals with chronic kidney disease (CKD). The purpose of this study was to examine if sex-specific risk of CVD differed across the age groups approximating premenopause (<45 y), perimenopause (45-54 y), and postmenopause (≥55 y) in patients with non-dialysis CKD who participated in the Chronic Renal Insufficiency Cohort (CRIC) observational study.

Methods

Cox proportional-hazards models were used to examine the age-stratified (<45 y, 45-54 y, and ≥55 y) association between sex and time to a composite of CVD events (heart failure, myocardial infarction, ischemic stroke, and peripheral artery disease). Secondary outcomes were individual components of the CVD composite.

Results

The median follow-up time was 7 years. In the entire cohort, males had a 32% higher risk of incident CVD (95% CI: 15-53%; Figure) than females after adjusting for age, race, clinic site, and traditional CVD risk factors, but not after further adjustment for markers of kidney disease (fully adjusted model). In the 45-54 y group, there was a 63% higher risk for CVD (95% CI: 4-157%) in males than females in the fully adjusted model. However, no sex-specific CVD risk was observed in the <45 y and ≥55 y groups in the fully adjusted model.

Conclusion

Our findings suggest that CKD may be a strong risk factor for CVD in females. Moreover, females may have a lower risk of CVD than males, particularly in the perimenopausal, but not premenopausal and postmenopausal ages.

Funding

  • NIDDK Support