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Kidney Week

Abstract: PO0763

Contemporary CKD Incidence Rates in Diabetes by Race/Ethnicity, Sex, and Age

Session Information

Category: Diabetic Kidney Disease

  • 602 Diabetic Kidney Disease: Clinical

Authors

  • Tuttle, Katherine R., Providence St Joseph Health, Renton, Washington, United States
  • Jones, Cami R., Providence St Joseph Health, Renton, Washington, United States
  • Daratha, Kenn B., Providence St Joseph Health, Renton, Washington, United States
  • Koyama, Alain, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Atlanta, Georgia, United States
  • Nicholas, Susanne B., University of California Los Angeles, Los Angeles, California, United States
  • Alicic, Radica Z., Providence St Joseph Health, Renton, Washington, United States
  • Norris, Keith C., University of California Los Angeles, Los Angeles, California, United States
  • Burrows, Nilka Rios, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Atlanta, Georgia, United States
  • Pavkov, Meda E., Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Atlanta, Georgia, United States

Group or Team Name

  • CURE-CKD
Background

Diabetes is the most common cause of chronic kidney disease (CKD), yet little is known about current CKD incidence rates and demographic predictors in these patients. The study aim was to estimate CKD incidence over time in adults with diabetes treated in two large healthcare systems.

Methods

The Center for Kidney Disease Research, Education, and Hope registry data is curated from electronic health records at Providence St. Joseph Health and University of California Los Angeles Health. Age, sex, and race/ethnicity adjusted CKD incidence rates were calculated over two-year time periods covering 2014–2019. CKD was identified by >2 laboratory measures (estimated glomerular filtration rate <60 mL/min/1.73m2, urine albumin/creatinine ratio ≥30 mg/g, urine protein/creatinine ratio ≥150 mg/g) ≥90 days apart or administrative codes. Diabetes was identified by laboratory measures (HbA1c, blood glucose), use of glucose-lowering medication, or administrative codes.

Results

The overall CKD incidence (95% CI) rate in diabetes declined from 109.1 cases/1000 person-years (106.1–112.1) in 2014-15, to 104.2 cases/1000 person-years (101.7–106.8) in 2016–17, to 96.0 cases/1000 person-years (93.5–98.5) in 2018–19 (p<0.001 for trend, Figure). CKD incidence only declined in Whites over these time periods. CKD incidence rates were lowest in Whites and Asians and highest in American Indians/Alaska Natives (AI/AN) and Native Hawaiians/Pacific Islanders (NH/PI). CKD incidence rates were higher in men than women and increased with age.

Conclusion

CKD incidence has recently declined in patients with diabetes overall, and specifically among Whites. AI/AN and NH/PI patients with diabetes had the highest rates of CKD incidence. Studies of targeted strategies in high-risk populations will be important to prevent CKD.

Figure.

Funding

  • Other U.S. Government Support