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Kidney Week

Abstract: PO0999

Prognostic Significance of Plasma Vaspin and Adiponectin Levels in Peritoneal Dialysis Patients

Session Information

  • Peritoneal Dialysis
    November 04, 2021 | Location: On-Demand, Virtual Only
    Abstract Time: 10:00 AM - 12:00 PM

Category: Dialysis

  • 702 Dialysis: Home Dialysis and Peritoneal Dialysis

Authors

  • Than, Win Hlaing, Carol & Richard Yu Peritoneal Dialysis Research Centre, Department of Medicine & Therapeutics, Prince of Wales Hospital, Shatin, Shatin, New Territories, Hong Kong
  • Szeto, Cheuk-Chun, Carol & Richard Yu Peritoneal Dialysis Research Centre, Department of Medicine & Therapeutics, Prince of Wales Hospital, Shatin, Shatin, New Territories, Hong Kong
Background

Adiponectin and vaspin are key adipokines that play important roles in the physiology of adipose tissue and contribute to the pathogenesis of metabolic disturbance in chronic kidney disease (CKD). We explored the prognostic role of plasma adiponectin and vaspin levels in peritoneal dialysis (PD) patients – a population that metabolic syndrome, obesity, and cachexia are all common.

Methods

We measured plasma adiponectin and vaspin levels in a cohort of new PD patients and analyzed their relation with patient survival.

Results

We studied 152 patients. Their mean age was 58.38 ± 11.67 years; 102 (67.1%) were men, 92 (60.5%) were diabetic. The median plasma adiponectin level was 31.98 (Interquartile range [IQR]: 16.81-49.49) mg/ml; median vaspin level 0.18 (IQR: 0.11-0.32) ng/ml. There was no significant correlation between plasma adiponectin and vaspin levels. Plasma adiponectin level had modest correlations with Charlson’s comorbidity score (r = -174, p = 0.039), triceps skin fold (r = -269, p = 0.001), and mass transfer area coefficient of peritoneum (r = 0.211; p = 0.015). In contrast, plasma vaspin level correlated with carotid-to-femoral pulse wave velocity (r = -240, p = 0.005), triceps skin fold (r = 0.198, p = 0.018), and extracellular to Intracellular fluid volume ratio (r = 170, p = 0.047). After adjusting for clinical confounders, plasma adiponectin and vaspin levels significantly predicted patient survival (adjusted hazard ratio [AHR] of adiponectin 1.018, 95% confidence interval [Cl] 1.004-1.031, p=0.010; AHR of vaspin 1.018, 95%Cl 1.008-1.029, p=0.001).

Conclusion

Plasma adiponectin level also correlated with peritoneal transport status, while plasma vaspin level correlated with the severity of fluid overload and atherosclerosis. Plasma levels of both adiponectin and vaspin are independent predictors of patient survival. Our results suggest that adiponectin and vaspin are involved in different pathways of metabolic disturbance in uremia.