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Abstract: PO2275

Association Between Monocyte Counts and All-Cause Mortality in Patients with CKD

Session Information

Category: CKD (Non-Dialysis)

  • 2101 CKD (Non-Dialysis): Epidemiology, Risk Factors, and Prevention

Authors

  • Oh, Ester, University of Colorado Denver School of Medicine, Aurora, Colorado, United States
  • You, Zhiying, University of Colorado Denver School of Medicine, Aurora, Colorado, United States
  • Jovanovich, Anna, University of Colorado Denver School of Medicine, Aurora, Colorado, United States
  • Nowak, Kristen L., University of Colorado Denver School of Medicine, Aurora, Colorado, United States
Background

In the general population, monocyte counts are strongly associated with a higher risk of all-cause mortality. However, little is known whether this association translates to individuals with chronic kidney disease (CKD). The purpose of this study was to examine if monocyte counts are associated with the risk of all-cause mortality in patients with non-dialysis CKD who participated in the Chronic Renal Insufficiency Cohort (CRIC) observational study.

Methods

Patients were divided in tertiles according to their monocyte counts at baseline, and survival analysis was performed using Kaplan-Meier curve with statistical comparison by the log rank test. Cox models with time interaction effects were used to examine the association between monocyte counts and all-cause mortality.

Results

Among the 3,939 CRIC participants, a total of 3,391 participants (1,838 males and 1,553 females) were included in the final analytic cohort, with a mean ± SD eGFR of 45 ± 15 mL/min/1.73 m2 and age of 58 ± 11 years. Participants in the highest tertile of monocyte count had a lower rate of survival than those in the lowest tertile (P<0.001, Figure). At follow-up time of 5 years, there was a 39% higher risk for all-cause mortality (95% CI: 22-59%) with every 2-fold increase of monocyte count after adjusting for age, sex, race, clinic site, traditional cardiovascular risk factors, markers of kidney disease, and c-reactive protein (fully adjusted model).

Conclusion

There may be an elevated risk for all-cause mortality in patients with CKD who have higher monocyte counts.

Funding

  • NIDDK Support