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Abstract: PO0074

Association of Sodium Abnormalities with Outcomes in Hospitalized Patients with and Without COVID-19

Session Information

Category: Coronavirus (COVID-19)

  • 000 Coronavirus (COVID-19)

Authors

  • Potu, Chetan, Stony Brook University Renaissance School of Medicine, Stony Brook, New York, United States
  • Nataraj, Nisha, Stony Brook University Renaissance School of Medicine, Stony Brook, New York, United States
  • Mallipattu, Sandeep K., Stony Brook University Renaissance School of Medicine, Stony Brook, New York, United States
  • Koraishy, Farrukh M., Stony Brook University Renaissance School of Medicine, Stony Brook, New York, United States
  • Arbeit, Leonard A., Stony Brook University Renaissance School of Medicine, Stony Brook, New York, United States
Background

Several reports of serum sodium (Na) abnormalities have been reported in patients hospitalized with COVID-19. However, the association of Na abnormalities with hospital outcomes have not been well-described in patients with COVID-19 (C19 +v. especially in comparison to those who tested negative (C19 -).

Methods

This is a retrospective analysis of the first surge of COVID-19 (C-19) in patients who presented to our ED from December 2019 -June 2020, with a systemic viral illness. There were 5,289 patients from the Covid19 data set, 1,703 COVID+ patients and 3,586 Covid- patients. Based on a nasal swab PCR patients were divided into two groups: C19 + and C19 –. Na levels at the time of hospitalization were used to divide patients into three groups: hyponatremia(hypoN) (<135), normonatremia (normoN)(135-145) and hypernatremia(hyperN)(>145). In C-19 patients, hypoN and hyperN were compared to normoN using multivariable (MV) models adjusting for comorbidities to calculate odds/risk (O/R) ratios for outcomes.

Results

C19 + patients,had significant increased incidence of HypoN (26.7% vs 16.2%;); and HyperN (4.2% vs 1.3%) compared to C19 -ve (Figure 1). Non MV analysis, among C19 + patients, found both HypoN and HyperN were significantly associated with mortality compared to normoN. HypoN (compared to normoN) was also associated with higher admission rate to the ICU, acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS), and intubation.(Figure 2a; 2b)

Conclusion

Among patients admitted with acute viral illness, Na abnormalities on admission were more prevalent in patients with COVID-19 + compared to those who tested negative. COVID-19 + patients with abnormal admission Na concentrations had increased mortality when compared to Cov - patients. Covid + patients had increased morbidity measured by admission to the ICU, need for intubation, and ARDS. Abnormalities in sodium metabolism predicts a poorer result in Covid-19 care.

Funding

  • Private Foundation Support