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Abstract: PO1288

Attitudes and Perceptions of APOL1 Genetic Testing in Black Patients with Hypertension: A Pilot Study

Session Information

Category: Genetic Diseases of the Kidneys

  • 1002 Genetic Diseases of the Kidneys: Non-Cystic

Authors

  • Lentine, Krista L., Saint Louis University School of Medicine, Saint Louis, Missouri, United States
  • Muiru, Anthony N., University of California San Francisco, San Francisco, California, United States
  • Lindsay, Kathryn K., Saint Louis University School of Medicine, Saint Louis, Missouri, United States
  • Mosman, Amy, Saint Louis University School of Medicine, Saint Louis, Missouri, United States
  • Caliskan, Yasar, Saint Louis University School of Medicine, Saint Louis, Missouri, United States
  • Freedman, Barry I., Wake Forest University School of Medicine, Winston-Salem, North Carolina, United States
  • Carriker, Amber, Mid-America Transplant Services, Saint Louis, Missouri, United States
  • Hsu, Chi-yuan, University of California San Francisco, San Francisco, California, United States
  • Miyata, Kana N., Saint Louis University School of Medicine, Saint Louis, Missouri, United States
  • Vo, Thanh-Mai Nguyen, Saint Louis University School of Medicine, Saint Louis, Missouri, United States
  • Edwards, John C., Saint Louis University School of Medicine, Saint Louis, Missouri, United States
  • Philipneri, Marie D., Saint Louis University School of Medicine, Saint Louis, Missouri, United States
Background

A portion of the chronic kidney disease risk in Black persons appears due to polymorphisms in the gene encoding apolipoprotein L1 (APOL1). While applications of APOL1 genotyping for prognostication (e.g. in evaluation of organ donors) are emerging, the interest of Black patients in APOL1 genotyping and implications for individual kidney risk management are not well defined.

Methods

In this pilot study, we offered APOL1 genetic testing and assessed attitudes and concerns related to APOL1 testing and kidney risk management among Black persons seen in the Hypertension & Nephrology clinics at one urban, Midwestern center.

Results

Among 110 participants with genotyping results to date, 56% were women, mean age was 58 years, 72% were obese, and a mean of 3 antihypertensive agents were used (Table). 13% had 2 APOL1 renal risk variants (high-risk genotypes), and 42% had 1 risk variant. At baseline, most participants (86%) reported that they were concerned about kidney disease, 90% thought it was a good idea to be tested for genes that may impact kidney disease, 82% would want APOL1 testing for their children, and only 26% expected to feel upset if they were APOL1 high risk. Most participants reported that knowledge of a high-risk APOL1 genotype would lead to changes in health-related behaviors (Figure).

Conclusion

Black patients at a Midwestern medical center were receptive towards APOL1 genetic testing and believed that testing would motivate changes in health-related behaviors. Ongoing research is needed to determine optimal patient-centered use of this emerging risk assessment tool.

(A) Cohort characteristics and (B) Anticipated Behaviors if Testing showed APOL1 High-Risk Genotype

Funding

  • Private Foundation Support