ASN's Mission

To create a world without kidney diseases, the ASN Alliance for Kidney Health elevates care by educating and informing, driving breakthroughs and innovation, and advocating for policies that create transformative changes in kidney medicine throughout the world.

learn more

Contact ASN

1401 H St, NW, Ste 900, Washington, DC 20005

email@asn-online.org

202-640-4660

The Latest on Twitter

Kidney Week

Abstract: PUB015

SARS-CoV-2 Antibody Dynamics in Chronic Hemodialysis Patients

Session Information

Category: Coronavirus (COVID-19)

  • 000 Coronavirus (COVID-19)

Authors

  • Thwin, Ohnmar, Renal Research Institute, New York, New York, United States
  • Grobe, Nadja, Renal Research Institute, New York, New York, United States
  • Ye, Xiaoling, Renal Research Institute, New York, New York, United States
  • Preciado, Priscila, Renal Research Institute, New York, New York, United States
  • Tapia Silva, Leticia Mirell, Renal Research Institute, New York, New York, United States
  • Cherif, Alhaji, Renal Research Institute, New York, New York, United States
  • Wang, Yuedong, University of California, Santa Barbara, Santa Barbara, California, United States
  • Kshirsagar, Abhijit V., UNC Kidney Center and Division of Nephrology & Hypertension. University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, North Carolina, United States
  • Kliger, Alan S., Yale University School of Medicine, New Haven, Connecticut, United States
  • Finkelstein, Fredric O., Yale University School of Medicine, New Haven, Connecticut, United States
  • Kotanko, Peter, Renal Research Institute, New York, New York, United States
Background

Data on the persistence of COVID-19 antibodies against SARS-CoV-2 in maintenance hemodialysis (MHD) patients from the U.S. is still scarce and an association with race and ethnicity is unknown. We explore antibody dynamics in MHD patients from three U.S. states with a diverse racial and ethnic background.

Methods

We obtained consent from MHD patients with COVID-19, confirmed by RT-PCR, from 12 clinics. Phase 1 antibody testing was done between June and August 2020. Re-testing was done 6-8 months later. Antibodies were tested with an emergency use authorized assay (Diazyme DZ-LITE SARS-CoV-2 IgG CLIA kit) .Linear mixed-effects models were employed to estimate the IgG half-life in patients with repeated IgG measurements. Patients were stratified by sex, race, ethnicity, obesity, and medians of age, dialysis vintage and body mass index.

Results

104 patients (age 63.8±13 years, 67 (64.4%) males; 48 (46.2%) Africa-American, and 34 (32.7%) Hispanics) were studied. IgG was obtained 82 days (range 13 to 151) and 253 days (range 170 to 309) post-COVID-19. At initial testing, 101 (97.1%) patients were positive for IgG. 89 of them were available for repeated testing, where 74 (83.1%) showed persistent IgG. The luminescence signal was declined by 35.5 AU/mL (95% CI 28.7 to 42.4) from 47.8 ± 44.9 to 12.3 ± 21.1 AU/mL (P<0.0001; paired t-test; Figure.1). The estimated half-life of IgG was 62.8 days (95% CI 56.8 to 68.8). We observed no significant differences in the stratified analysis (Table 1; all p > 0.05).

Conclusion

The half-life of IgG against SARS-CoV-2 was approximately 63 days, corroborating reports from both the general and other MHD populations. Importantly, we found no association between IgG half-life, race and ethnicity.