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Kidney Week

Abstract: PO2076

Impact of Native Kidney Disease on Post-Transplant Cancer Development

Session Information

Category: Transplantation

  • 1902 Transplantation: Clinical

Authors

  • Caliskan, Yasar, Saint Louis University School of Medicine, Saint Louis, Missouri, United States
  • Axelrod, David, The University of Iowa Hospitals and Clinics Department of Pathology, Iowa City, Iowa, United States
  • Li, Ruixin, Saint Louis University School of Medicine, Saint Louis, Missouri, United States
  • Cheungpasitporn, Wisit, Mayo Clinic Minnesota, Rochester, Minnesota, United States
  • Schnitzler, Mark, Saint Louis University School of Medicine, Saint Louis, Missouri, United States
  • Alhamad, Tarek, Washington University in St Louis School of Medicine, St Louis, Missouri, United States
  • Chang, Su-Hsin, Washington University in St Louis School of Medicine, St Louis, Missouri, United States
  • Lentine, Krista L., Saint Louis University School of Medicine, Saint Louis, Missouri, United States
Background

Long-term risk of cancer development among patients with glomerulonephritis (GN) and congenital anomalies of the kidney and urinary tract (CAKUT) have been shown previously. However, the association between native kidney disease and de novo cancers after kidney transplantation (KTx) needed to be clarified.

Methods

We examined national Scientific Registry of Transplant Recipients (SRTR) data for patients underwent KTx (2000-2021) to investigate the association of native kidney disease with de novo cancer diagnoses after KTx. Patient with history of previous transplant and patients with history of cancer before KTx were excluded. We identified KTx recipients with hypertension (HTN) (n=68432), diabetes mellitus (DM) (n=79809), glomerulonephritis (GN) (n=54381), CAKUT (n=6508) and others (n=56048) as cause of native kidney disease.

Results

Compared with the reference HTN group, GN (aHR, 1.311.391.48) and CAKUT (aHR, 1.201.371.57) groups are significantly associated with higher risk of new onset cancers at 5 years post-KTx (Figure 1). GN (aHR, 1.231.311.39) and CAKUT (aHR, 1.091.241.40) groups are also associated with a higher risk of acute rejection within the 6 months post-KTx. Regarding graft failure, GN (aHR, 0.890.920.95) and others (aHR, 0.770.800.82) groups have significantly lower risk of 5 years all cause graft failure compared to reference group. However, the risk of death censored graft failure was significantly lower in DM (aHR, 0.840.900.96) and others (aHR, 0.800.830.87) groups.

Conclusion

Native kidney diseases, GN and CAKUT, have been associated with acute rejection and de novo cancers after KTx. Immunosuppressive treatment and cancer screening may need to be modified according to native kidney disease.