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Abstract: PO2176

LIMS1 Risk Genotype and Clinicopathological Features of Kidney Transplant Recipients

Session Information

Category: Transplantation

  • 1902 Transplantation: Clinical

Authors

  • Caliskan, Yasar, Saint Louis University School of Medicine, Saint Louis, Missouri, United States
  • Ozluk, Yasemin, Istanbul Universitesi Istanbul Tip Fakultesi, Istanbul, Istanbul, Turkey
  • Mirioglu, Safak, Istanbul Universitesi Istanbul Tip Fakultesi, Istanbul, Istanbul, Turkey
  • Dirim, Ahmet Burak, Istanbul Universitesi Istanbul Tip Fakultesi, Istanbul, Istanbul, Turkey
  • Kekik, Cigdem, Istanbul Universitesi Istanbul Tip Fakultesi, Istanbul, Istanbul, Turkey
  • Safak, Seda, Istanbul Universitesi Istanbul Tip Fakultesi, Istanbul, Istanbul, Turkey
  • Guller, Nurana, Istanbul Universitesi Istanbul Tip Fakultesi, Istanbul, Istanbul, Turkey
  • Yazici, Halil, Istanbul Universitesi Istanbul Tip Fakultesi, Istanbul, Istanbul, Turkey
  • Oto, Ozgur Akin, Istanbul Universitesi Istanbul Tip Fakultesi, Istanbul, Istanbul, Turkey
  • Edwards, John C., Saint Louis University School of Medicine, Saint Louis, Missouri, United States
  • Savran Oguz, Fatma, Istanbul Universitesi Istanbul Tip Fakultesi, Istanbul, Istanbul, Turkey
  • Turkmen, Aydin, Istanbul Universitesi Istanbul Tip Fakultesi, Istanbul, Istanbul, Turkey
  • Lentine, Krista L., Saint Louis University School of Medicine, Saint Louis, Missouri, United States
Background

LIM Zinc Finger Domain Containing 1 (LIMS1) homozygous risk genotype (rs893403 GG) is associated with increased risk of T-cell mediated rejection (TCMR) after kidney transplantation (KTx). However, prior studies lack detailed histopathological data. We examined the association of LIMS1 genotype with histopathology of allograft rejection.

Methods

A total of 110 KTx recipients underwent allograft biopsy were genotyped for LIMS1 rs893403 variant by Sanger sequencing followed by PCR confirmation of the deletion. The 2013 Banff scores from allograft biopsies were compared between recipients homozygous for LIMS1 rs893403 genotype GG (n=24) versus AA/AG genotypes (n=86).

Results

There were no differences regarding demographic, clinical and laboratory features between the genotype groups (Table 1). Allograft biopsies were performed after a median 6.2 years after KTx. Serum creatinine, proteinuria and donor specific antibody levels at the time of biopsies were similar between groups. Banff median tubulitis score was significantly higher in GG group compared to AA/AG group (1.42±0.65 vs 1.12±0.66, p=0.03) (Figure 1). There were also no significant differences regarding histopathological diagnosis between the groups (Table 1).

Conclusion

Kidney transplant recipients with homozygous LIMS1 deletion had higher tubulitis scores. Our data supports the role of LIMS1 locus in the pathophysiology of allograft rejection and motivates ongoing work to elucidate mechanisms of association of LIMS1 risk genotype and allograft injury.