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Abstract: PO0478

Cardiorenal Anemia Syndrome in Heart Failure Patients with Reduced vs. Preserved Ejection Fraction: An Insight from the Middle East

Session Information

Category: Anemia and Iron Metabolism

  • 200 Anemia and Iron Metabolism

Authors

  • Manla, Yosef, Cleveland Clinic Abu Dhabi, Abu Dhabi, Abu Dhabi, United Arab Emirates
  • Bader, Feras, Cleveland Clinic Abu Dhabi, Abu Dhabi, Abu Dhabi, United Arab Emirates
  • Hashmani, Shahrukh, Cleveland Clinic Abu Dhabi, Abu Dhabi, Abu Dhabi, United Arab Emirates
  • Ghalib, Hussam, Cleveland Clinic Abu Dhabi, Abu Dhabi, Abu Dhabi, United Arab Emirates
  • El Nekidy, Wasim, Cleveland Clinic Abu Dhabi, Abu Dhabi, Abu Dhabi, United Arab Emirates
  • Hijazi, Fadi A., Cleveland Clinic Abu Dhabi, Abu Dhabi, Abu Dhabi, United Arab Emirates
  • Attallah, Nizar M., Cleveland Clinic Abu Dhabi, Abu Dhabi, Abu Dhabi, United Arab Emirates
Background

Patients with cardiorenal syndrome (CRS) have an increased risk of developing anemia, resulting in cardiorenal anemia syndrome (CRAS), which can lead to worsening renal and cardiac functions. This gets more complicated when multiple systemic conditions co-exist, such as in heart failure with preserved ejection fraction (HFpEF). To better understand the interplay between anemia, the heart, and the kidney, we aim to explore patients’ characteristics of CRAS within different heart failure (HF) phenotypes, in the Middle East Region.

Methods

We included HF patients having stage 3-5 CKD (n=230) at their first visit to our HF clinic from October 2015 to January 2019. Patient characteristics were collected by a retrospective chart review. A comparison was made between HFrEF and HFpEF in CRAS patients in terms of baseline characteristics and iron deficiency anemia surrogates using appropriate parametric or non-parametric (for skewed variables) testing methods, and a p-value< 0.05 was considered statistically significant.

Results

Among 230 patients with cardiorenal syndrome, 138 (60%) of patients had anemia (Hb<120 g/L). There was no significant difference in the prevalence of anemia in the HFrEF- CRS group vs. HFpEF- CRS group (57.4% vs. 66.2%, p=0.2). When comparing HFrEF- CRAS patients with HFpEF- CRAS patients, the HFpEF group were more likely females, had lower hemoglobin, and higher rates of cardiovascular co-morbidities (Table). Furthermore, there was no significant difference in iron deficiency parameters between the two groups.

Conclusion

In this part of the world, where cardio-renal-metabolic conditions are highly prevalent, the prevalence of anemia among CRS patients is comparable to western countries and it was comparable among HFpEF and HFrEF CRS patients