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Abstract: PO1063

Mind Map, an Educational Tool for Teaching Clinical Reasoning in Nephrology: A Mixed-Method Study

Session Information

  • Educational Research
    November 04, 2021 | Location: On-Demand, Virtual Only
    Abstract Time: 10:00 AM - 12:00 PM

Category: Educational Research

  • 800 Educational Research

Authors

  • Hamroun, Aghiles, Centre Hospitalier Universitaire de Lille, Lille, Hauts-de-France, France
  • Lepers, Eléonore, Universite de Lille Faculte de Medecine, Lille, Hauts-de-France, France
  • Dupré, Aurélie, Universite de Lille Faculte de Medecine, Lille, Hauts-de-France, France
  • Truffert, Patrick, Centre Hospitalier Universitaire de Lille, Lille, Hauts-de-France, France
  • Glowacki, François, Centre Hospitalier Universitaire de Lille, Lille, Hauts-de-France, France
Background

Nephrology is commonly considered as one of the most complex disciplines for medical students, justifying the implementation of new educational tools. Although its relevance has been well-established, the mind map is still marginally used in medical education. The objective of this study is to assess the contribution of mind map for teaching clinical reasoning in nephrology.

Methods

Between November 2020 and April 2021, three groups of med students (4th to 6th year) were provided with a teaching program of 5 weekly sessions of 30-45 minutes focused on three topics (serum creatinine elevation/AKI, glomerular syndromes, dysnatremia), each developed through a specific mind map.
The contribution of this program was evaluated by a mixed method:
1. quantitative assessment: comparison of three quiz scores respectively the day before, day after and two weeks after each learning session (paired Wilcoxon tests);
2. qualitative assessment: focus group interviews with each group at the end of the teaching program.

Results

In total, 12 med students took part in this educational experience (respectively four in 4th, 5th and 6th years).
Quiz scores were significantly higher after each teaching session and overall (28.0 [26.0; 31.4], 33.0 [31.2; 36.1], 34.4 [32.4; 37.0] respectively at baseline, immediately after and after two weeks, p < 0.001) (Fig1).
Moreover, focus group interviews highlighted several themes about the specific contribution of mind map (in addition to previous standard lessons): logical and intuitive tool, effective for quick knowledge transmission, promoting long-term memorization and providing a global/integrated vision of clinical reasoning in nephrology.

Conclusion

Mind map appears to be an interesting educational tool in teaching clinical nephrology reasoning to medical students.

Figure 1. Quiz scores at three assessment times (day before, day after and two weeks after each session) and by topic. On the right, global results pooling the scores of all topical sessions.