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Kidney Week

Abstract: PO2150

Renal Transplant Biopsy Outcomes: A Nephrology and Radiology Standpoint in an Academic Center

Session Information

Category: Transplantation

  • 1902 Transplantation: Clinical

Authors

  • Patil, Rhea, University of Miami School of Medicine, Miami, Florida, United States
  • Cortesi, Camilo, University of Miami School of Medicine, Miami, Florida, United States
  • Sedki, Mai, University of Miami School of Medicine, Miami, Florida, United States
  • Cabeza Rivera, Franco H., The University of Mississippi Medical Center, Jackson, Mississippi, United States
  • Carias Martinez, Karla G., University of Miami School of Medicine, Miami, Florida, United States
  • Ruiz, Phillip, University of Miami School of Medicine, Miami, Florida, United States
  • Salsamendi, Jason T., University of Miami School of Medicine, Miami, Florida, United States
  • Guerra, Giselle, University of Miami School of Medicine, Miami, Florida, United States
  • Mattiazzi, Adela D., University of Miami School of Medicine, Miami, Florida, United States
Background

Renal transplant biopsies are the gold standard for evaluating allograft dysfunction. Studies comparing biopsy safety outcomes between transplant nephrologist and interventional radiologist are lacking. We describe our academic center experience and identify their risk factors.

Methods

This is a retrospective study of patients who underwent percutaneous ultrasound-guided renal transplant biopsy (US-RTB) at a single center between January 2013 to August 2016. This cohort was stratified into two groups according to the team that performed the biopsy: interventional radiology(IR,n=447) and transplant nephrology(TN,n=231). The predictors of post-biopsy complications were assessed by multivariate logistic regression.

Results

A total of 678 US-RTB were performed in 573 patients. There was no significant difference in the rate of total complications, blood transfusion, or perinephric hematoma between the IR and TN groups. The regression analysis showed that the team that performed the biopsy was not a significant predictor for total complications, blood transfusion or perinephric hematoma.
The significant predictors of total complications were uncontrolled blood pressure and anticoagulation therapy. The predictors of blood transfusion were female sex, antiplatelet therapy, anticoagulation therapy, and blood urea nitrogen. The predictors of perinephric hematoma were female sex, black race, uncontrolled blood pressure, and anticoagulation therapy(Figure).

Conclusion

Kidney transplant biopsies are safe when performed by transplant nephrologists and interventional radiologists in an academic center. Blood pressure control and management of anticoagulation are fundamental to decrease the risk of complications. Studies need to be done to understand why sex and race were predictors for blood transfusion and perinephric hematoma.