ASN's Mission

ASN leads the fight to prevent, treat, and cure kidney diseases throughout the world by educating health professionals and scientists, advancing research and innovation, communicating new knowledge, and advocating for the highest quality care for patients.

learn more

Contact ASN

1401 H St, NW, Ste 900, Washington, DC 20005

email@asn-online.org

202-640-4660

The Latest on Twitter

Kidney Week

Abstract: PO1442

High Expression of Mincle in Intermediate Monocytes of Patients with Autoimmune Diseases

Session Information

Category: Glomerular Diseases

  • 1202 Glomerular Diseases: Immunology and Inflammation

Authors

  • Li, Shuping, The Seventh Affiliated Hospital, Sun Yat-Sen University, Shenzhen, Guangdong, China
  • Cheng, Lokyu, The Seventh Affiliated Hospital, Sun Yat-Sen University, Shenzhen, Guangdong, China
  • Cui, Tianjiao, The Seventh Affiliated Hospital, Sun Yat-Sen University, Shenzhen, Guangdong, China
  • Zhang, Lanyue, The Seventh Affiliated Hospital, Sun Yat-Sen University, Shenzhen, Guangdong, China
  • Tian, Xiuxun, The Seventh Affiliated Hospital, Sun Yat-Sen University, Shenzhen, Guangdong, China
  • Zhao, Zhizhuang Joe, Department of Pathology, University of Oklahoma Health Sciences Center, Oklahoma City, Oklahoma, United States
  • Chen, Yun, The Seventh Affiliated Hospital, Sun Yat-Sen University, Shenzhen, Guangdong, China
  • Zheng, Zhihua, The Seventh Affiliated Hospital, Sun Yat-Sen University, Shenzhen, Guangdong, China
Background

Macrophage-inducible C-type lectin (Mincle) is a transmembrane C-type lectin receptor that is predominantly expressed on macrophages’ surface and recognizes a broad range of self and foreign antigens as part of innate immune sensing, thus playing a pivotal role in tailoring immune response. Mincle’s function associates with its expression levels on immune cells’ surfaces. However, the differential expression of Mincle in various types of immune cells between patients with autoimmune disease (AD) and normal controls (NCs) is yet to be examined, and its clinical relevance remains unclear. Therefore, this study aimed to investigate Mincle expression and distribution in different types of immune cells in patients with AD and NCs, and to explore the clinical relevance and potential mechanisms of Mincle expression levels in immune cells of peripheral blood in patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE).

Methods

Mincle expression levels in leukocyte subgroups and monocyte subsets of peripheral blood from all participants were analyzed using flow cytometry and real time PCR, and the clinical characteristics of patients with SLE were collected for correlation analysis. Intermediate monocyte (IM) were co-cultured with naïve T cells, and the differentiations of naïve T cells were detected by flow cytometry.

Results

Mincle was expressed predominantly in myeloid cells, both in peripheral blood and cell lines. Moreover, monocytes expressed higher levels of Mincle than granulocytes in both patients with AD and NCs, and Mincle expression levels were higher in IMs of patients with AD, including patients with SLE, than in those of NCs; however, Mincle was not differentially expressed in granulocytes, lymphocytes, classical monocytes, and nonclassical monocytes between the two groups. In addition, Mincle expression was positively correlated with immunoglobulin G and κ-LC levels in serum but negatively related to serological renal function index (serum urea and creatinine levels) in patients with SLE. IMs increase the differentiation of toward Th1, Th2 and Th17, but IMs decrease naïve T cells toward Treg.

Conclusion

High expression levels of Mincle in IMs were associated with elevated immunological indicators in patients with SLE. IM influences the differentiation of T cells in patients with SLE.