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Abstract: PO1389

Role of Klotho in Aging, Relationship with Frailty, Renal Function, and Body Composition

Session Information

Category: Geriatric Nephrology

  • 1100 Geriatric Nephrology

Authors

  • Betti, Paolo, IRCCS Ospedale San Raffaele, Milano, Lombardia, Italy
  • De Filippo, Marta, IRCCS Ospedale San Raffaele, Milano, Lombardia, Italy
  • Simonini, Marco, IRCCS Ospedale San Raffaele, Milano, Lombardia, Italy
  • Fontana, Simone, IRCCS Ospedale San Raffaele, Milano, Lombardia, Italy
  • Citterio, Lorena, IRCCS Ospedale San Raffaele, Milano, Lombardia, Italy
  • Messaggio, Elisabetta, IRCCS Ospedale San Raffaele, Milano, Lombardia, Italy
  • Rovere Querini, Patrizia, IRCCS Ospedale San Raffaele, Milano, Lombardia, Italy
  • Brioni, Elena, IRCCS Ospedale San Raffaele, Milano, Lombardia, Italy
  • Magnaghi, Cristiano, IRCCS Ospedale San Raffaele, Milano, Lombardia, Italy
  • Lanzani, Chiara, IRCCS Ospedale San Raffaele, Milano, Lombardia, Italy
  • Manunta, Paolo, IRCCS Ospedale San Raffaele, Milano, Lombardia, Italy
Background

Reduced expression of the Klotho protein has been associated with premature aging and increased mortality. Our aim is to evaluate the relationships between plasma Klotho levels and frailty, renal function and anthropometric parameters.

Methods

We enrolled a cohort of 1250 volunteers aged > 65 years (FRASNET Study) in recreation centers for the elderly, in hospital’s outpatient clinic and in nursing homes. All the volunteers have signed informed consent and subjects with severe cognitive impairment were excluded (MMSE >18). We measured eGFR (CKD-EPI formula) and body composition by impedancemetry. Plasma Klotho was assayed by an ELISA kit on 194 samples. Frailty was classified according to Fried's criteria.

Results

A positive correlation between plasma Klotho and renal function (eGFR) was detected (fig 1). In agreement with what previously observed, in a younger population, we confirmed a reduction of klothemia in the sarcopenic patients (713 vs 791 pg/mL, p=0.0007 in patients with muscle mass <25th centile) and in patients with high visceral fat mass (fig.2).
On the other hand, we did not observe different levels of plasma Klotho according to the frailty class or in relation to age.

Conclusion

In our elderly population, the plasma levels of Klotho do not correlate with age. Therefore, our results confirm the relevance of this biomarker in identifying pathological aging, in consideration of its association within the elderly population with CKD, abdominal obesity and sarcopenia (sarcopenic obesity). Klotho expression was demonstrated as an independent predictor of death in a follow up-study and was related to many diseases (e.g.: cognitive impairment, cardiovascular disease). The relation of plasma klotho levels and renal function is debated, and conflicting results have been published. Our findings evidenced a significative association of plasma Klotho with renal function and body composition.

Funding

  • Private Foundation Support