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Kidney Week

Abstract: PO1261

Polycystic Kidney Disease Associates with Increased Myopia and Retinal Breaks

Session Information

Category: Genetic Diseases of the Kidneys

  • 1001 Genetic Diseases of the Kidneys: Cystic

Authors

  • Dangelser, Brady Marcus, University of Wisconsin-Madison, Madison, Wisconsin, United States
  • Imasuen, Uyi Jefferson, University of Wisconsin-Madison, Madison, Wisconsin, United States
  • Chang, Jonathan, University of Wisconsin-Madison, Madison, Wisconsin, United States
  • Potter, Heather Ad, University of Wisconsin-Madison, Madison, Wisconsin, United States
  • Djamali, Arjang, University of Wisconsin-Madison, Madison, Wisconsin, United States
  • Bhutani, Gauri, University of Wisconsin-Madison, Madison, Wisconsin, United States
Background

Ophthalmologic manifestations in Polycystic Kidney Disease (PKD) are not known.

Methods

We conducted a retrospective cohort study using EMR data extraction. All adult patients with polycystic kidney disease (“PKD”) and CKD from another cause (“non-PKD/CKD”), seen at our center between 1/1/2000-4/30/2020, and Eye disorders of interest in these 2 cohorts were identified using ICD-9/10 diagnostic codes. The date of the first visit to Nephrology clinic was regarded as “Index date”. The prevalence of Eye disorders at the index date was compared between “PKD” and “non-PKD CKD” cohorts.

Results

A total of 859 patients with “PKD” and 8309 patients with “non-PKD/CKD” were seen at our center over the study duration. Majority of patients in both groups were male (58% [498] and 54% [4457]) and identified as White (88% [758] and 86% [7185]). At the index date, PKD patients were younger (mean age 55 vs 60 years in non-PKD/CKD; p<0.01) and had shorter follow up time (median 901 vs 1311 days; p<0.01). PKD patients had higher eGFR (52 [31-81; N=795) vs 43 ml/min/1.73m2 [29-59; N=7342]; p<0.01) and lower prevalence of diabetes mellitus at the index date (23% [198] vs 39% [3270]; p<0.01). Hypertension prevalence was similar between the two groups (91% [778] and 90% [7444]). Myopia and all Retinal breaks (with or without detachment) were found to be higher in PKD as compared to non-PKD/CKD after multivariable adjustment for age, gender, race, diabetes and follow up time (adjusted odds ratio 1.4 [95% CI: 1.1-1.7] and 1.7 [1-2.8], respectively; p<0.01). Retinal breaks with detachments by themselves were also more frequent in PKD but did not reach statistical significance (Table). Peripheral retinal degeneration was similar between the two groups.

Conclusion

There is increased prevalence of Myopia and Retinal breaks in PKD compared to non-PKD/CKD. These ophthalmologic findings could be potential extra-renal manifestation of PKD. Comparison with general population prevalence and investigations into the mechanism are needed for confirmation.

Prevalence of Eye Disorders in PKD vs non-PKD/CKD
Disorder groupPrevalance at Index Date (% [N])Adjusted Odds Ratio (95% CI)P-value
PKD (N=859)Non-PKD/CKD (N=8309)P-value
Myopia12 (103)11.2 (928)0.471.4 (1.1-1.7)<0.01
Peripheral Retinal Degeneration1.4 (12)1.6 (134)0.631 (0.6-1.9)0.91
Retinal break without detachment1.6 (14)0.8 (69)0.022.4 (1.3-4.3)<0.01
Retinal break with detachment1.3 (11)0.95 (79)0.351.6 (0.8-3)0.17