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Abstract: PO0122

An ISN-DOPPS Survey of the Global Impact of COVID-19 Pandemic on Home Peritoneal Dialysis Services

Session Information

Category: Coronavirus (COVID-19)

  • 000 Coronavirus (COVID-19)

Authors

  • Albakr, Rehab Bakr, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario, Canada
  • Bieber, Brian, Arbor Research Collaborative for Health, Ann Arbor, Michigan, United States
  • Aylward, Ryan E., University of Bristol Medical School, Bristol, Bristol, United Kingdom
  • Caskey, Fergus, University of Bristol Medical School, Bristol, Bristol, United Kingdom
  • Dreyer, Gavin, Barts Health NHS Trust, London, London, United Kingdom
  • Evans, Rhys David Russell, The University of British Columbia, Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada
  • Guedes, Murilo Henrique, Pontificia Universidade Catolica do Parana, Curitiba, PR, Brazil
  • Jha, Vivekanand, The George Institute for Global Health, New Delhi, India
  • Luyckx, Valerie A., Brigham and Women's Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts, United States
  • Pecoits-Filho, Roberto, Arbor Research Collaborative for Health, Ann Arbor, Michigan, United States
  • Phiri, Chimota Thomas, Queen Elizabeth Central Hospital, Blantyre, Southern Region, Malawi
  • Pisoni, Ronald L., Arbor Research Collaborative for Health, Ann Arbor, Michigan, United States
  • Robinson, Bruce M., Arbor Research Collaborative for Health, Ann Arbor, Michigan, United States
  • Singh Shah, Dibya, Tribhuvan University, Kirtipur, Kathmandu, Nepal
  • Tannor, Elliot Koranteng, Kwame Nkrumah University of Science and Technology, Kumasi, Ashanti, Ghana
  • Liew, Adrian, Mount Elizabeth Medical Centre, Singapore, Singapore
  • Perl, Jeffrey, St. Michael's Hospital, Toronto, Ontario, Canada

Group or Team Name

  • ISN DOPPS collaboration
Background

Home dialysis may be able to minimize SARS-CoV2 exposure risks. The pandemic may have introduced unique challenges related to supply disruption and care delivery changes. We sought to assess the global burden of COVID-19 on peritoneal dialysis units (PD) and understand PD unit practice changes during this time.

Methods

The Peritoneal Dialysis/Dialysis Outcomes and Practice Patterns Study (PDOPPS/DOPPS) and International Society of Nephrology (ISN) administered a web-based survey (1) to dialysis units selected based on a random sample stratified by region (November 2020 – March 2021), and (2) to an open invitation via ISN’s membership list and social media (March 2021). Responses were compared across 10 ISN regions.

Results

Returned surveys included 167 PD facilities across 52 countries. Changes in several care domains including clinic communication and frequency, labwork frequency, method of communication, masking policies, changes in handling of PD effluent among infected individuals, PD supply disruption, access to methods of PD catheter insertion and frequency of new patient training are highlighted (table).

Conclusion

Variability exists in routine PD care, and the availability and use of PPE, disruption in PD supplies among the different regions reflecting the availability of the resources and infrastructure differences. LMIC tended to be more severely impacted—this gap needs to be addressed in anticipation of future pandemics for treatment continuity. Although remote technology use among PD patients to communicate with their physicians has increased during the pandemic, optimal communication frequency, methods and schedule of routine bloodwork needs to be better elucidated.