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Kidney Week

Abstract: PO1738

Food Purchasing Patterns Among Participants of a Dietary Intervention Trial for African Americans with Hypertension and CKD

Session Information

Category: Health Maintenance, Nutrition, and Metabolism

  • 1300 Health Maintenance, Nutrition, and Metabolism

Authors

  • Aggarwal, Rohin A., Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, Maryland, United States
  • Iragavarapu, Meghana Sai, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, Maryland, United States
  • Grover, Raneitra, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, Maryland, United States
  • Sheikh, Taharat T., Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, Maryland, United States
  • Brody, Rebecca, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, Maryland, United States
  • Carson, Kathryn A., Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, Maryland, United States
  • Omenyi, Chiazam, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, Maryland, United States
  • Miller, Edgar R., Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, Maryland, United States
  • Crews, Deidra C., Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, Maryland, United States

Group or Team Name

  • Five Plus Nuts and Beans for Kidneys Investigators
Background

Financial resources and the surrounding food environment can impact healthy food purchasing patterns and may play a role in disparities in CKD. We examined predictors of healthy food purchases among control group participants of a clinical trial who were assigned to receive a gift card to a grocer worth $30 per week for 4 months ($480 total) but received no specific guidance on purchases.

Methods

We examined purchasing patterns of 50 participants using receipts linked to a grocer club card. The primary outcome of interest was the number of fresh or frozen fruit or vegetable items purchased, dichotomized at the median to those purchasing <= 6 and > 6 types of fruits/vegetables. Predictors examined included participant sociodemographic factors and food environment factors (i.e. living in a healthy food priority area). Statistical analyses included descriptive statistics and multiple linear regression.

Results

All participants were African American; median age was 63 yrs; 64% were female. Most (78%) were either unemployed or retired; 58% received a H.S. diploma/GED or less. Half had annual income < $25,000. Purchases made included both food and non-food items and many used other funds beyond those from the study. Adjusting for income, women purchased 2.3 more fruit/vegetable items than men (95% CI 0.2-4.5). Those purchasing more fruits/vegetables spent a greater total amount than those purchasing fewer fruits/vegetables.

Conclusion

In a dietary intervention trial for African Americans with CKD, healthy food purchases differed by sex, income level, and dollar amount spent, but not by food security or neighborhood food environment.

Participant Characteristics by Number of Fruits/Vegetables Purchased
 ≤ 6 (N=26)> 6 (N=24)P value
Age in years, median (IQR)65 (56-71)62.5 (55-68)0.41
Female, %13 (50)19 (79)0.04
Employed full or part time, %4 (15)10 (42)0.06
Income group:
< $10,000
$10,000-24,999
$25,000-49,999
$50,000-99,999
$100,000+
-
6 (29)
9 (43)
5 (24)
1 (5)
0 (0)
-
2 (11)
8 (42)
4 (21)
3 (16)
2 (11)
0.04
Lives in Healthy Food Priority Area (limited food access)8 (31)4 (17)0.35
Food insecure (self-reported)9 (35)7 (29)0.77
Total dollars spent, median (IQR)$355.3 (179.7-467.7)508.9 (356.5-604.2)0.003
Dollars spent on fruits/vegetables, median (IQR)$29.4 (21.5-72.9)$88.8 (60.2-117.6)<0.001

Funding

  • Other NIH Support