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Abstract: PO2092

Vitamin D Status and SARS-CoV-2 Infection in a Cohort of Renal Transplanted Patients

Session Information

Category: Transplantation

  • 1902 Transplantation: Clinical

Authors

  • Regalia, Anna, Fondazione IRCCS Ca' Granda Ospedale Maggiore Policlinico, Milan, Lombardia, Italy
  • Malvica, Silvia, Fondazione IRCCS Ca' Granda Ospedale Maggiore Policlinico, Milan, Lombardia, Italy
  • Alfieri, Carlo, Fondazione IRCCS Ca' Granda Ospedale Maggiore Policlinico, Milan, Lombardia, Italy
  • Campise, Mariarosaria, Fondazione IRCCS Ca' Granda Ospedale Maggiore Policlinico, Milan, Lombardia, Italy
  • Cresseri, Donata Carmela, Fondazione IRCCS Ca' Granda Ospedale Maggiore Policlinico, Milan, Lombardia, Italy
  • Gandolfo, Maria Teresa, Fondazione IRCCS Ca' Granda Ospedale Maggiore Policlinico, Milan, Lombardia, Italy
  • Messa, Piergiorgio, Fondazione IRCCS Ca' Granda Ospedale Maggiore Policlinico, Milan, Lombardia, Italy
Background

Immunomodulatory and anti-inflammatory properties have been hypothesized for native vitamin D (nVD). Very little is reported about nVD and risk of Sars-CoV-2 infection (COV) in renal transplant (RTx). In a cohort of renal transplanted patients (RTxp) we retrospectively evaluated: a) nVD status in patients with (COV+) and without (COV-) COV infection; b) the impact of nVD status on severity of COV.

Methods

The study includes 61 COV+ in whom nVD status was available in the year before the infection, and 122 COV- matched 1:2 for age (53[45-64]years), gender (M=60.7%), RTx vintage (7[2-15]years), presence of diabetes (18%), arterial hypertension (85%) and cardiac symptomatic disease (3%). Renal function, 24-h proteinuria, mineral metabolism (MM) parameters were evaluated at 1, 6 and 12 months before COV whereas nVD status was considered as the mean 25-OH-VD levels at the same timepoints. Severity of COV was based on the need for hospitalization (HOSP+: 27/61, 44.3%) and death (D+: 6/61, 9.8%).

Results

a) nVD levels were significantly lower in COV+ than in COV- (19[12-26] ng/mL and 23[16-30] ng/mL, respectively, p=0.01). No differences in the other biochemical parameters were found. The COV discriminative power of nVD status was evaluated by ROC curve (AUC 0.61, 95% CI 0.54-0.68, p=0.01), with a value of 25-OHVD 23.9 ng/mL showing the best discriminative power (sensibility 72%, specificity 47%).
b) nVD levels showed a trend towards lower values in HOSP+COV+ than HOSP-COV+ (17[8-25] ng/mL vs 20[14-26] ng/mL) and in D+COV+ than D-COV+ (13[6-23] ng/mL vs 20[13-26] ng/mL), although these differences did not reach the statistical significance (p=0.1 and p=0.2, respectively).

Conclusion

With the limitations of the retrospective nature of the study and the small sample size, our data report that:
a) COV+ showed lower nVD levels in the year preceding the infection compared to controls with similar main demographic features and comorbid conditions; b) No differences were found in renal function, proteinuria, and other MM parameters between the two groups; c) No association was found between nVD levels in the year preceding the infection and COV severity.