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Abstract: PO0834

Prevalence and Demographic Correlates of Pain, Depression, Fatigue, and Readiness to Seek Treatment for These Symptoms in Hemodialysis Patients

Session Information

Category: Dialysis

  • 701 Dialysis: Hemodialysis and Frequent Dialysis

Authors

  • Devaraj, Susan M., University of Pittsburgh Department of Medicine, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, United States
  • Yabes, Jonathan, University of Pittsburgh Department of Medicine, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, United States
  • Roumelioti, Maria-Eleni, University of New Mexico School of Medicine, Albuquerque, New Mexico, United States
  • Steel, Jennifer L., University of Pittsburgh Department of Medicine, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, United States
  • Erickson, Sarah Jane, University of New Mexico School of Medicine, Albuquerque, New Mexico, United States
  • Unruh, Mark L., University of New Mexico School of Medicine, Albuquerque, New Mexico, United States
  • Jhamb, Manisha, University of Pittsburgh Department of Medicine, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, United States
Background

Patients with End Stage Renal Disease on hemodialysis (HD) experience a high burden of pain, fatigue and depressive symptoms. This study aims to better understand demographic differences in symptom burden and readiness to seek treatment among HD patients being recruited for an ongoing multi-center randomized controlled trial (TACcare).

Methods

Patients on in-center HD were screened for clinical levels of pain (Likert scale ≥4), fatigue (Likert scale ≥5), and depression (Patient Health Questionnaire-9 score ≥10) within the last 2 weeks. Patients with at least one clinical symptom were then screened to assess readiness for seeking treatment for symptoms, and eligible to enroll if they were at least in the contemplation stage of Readiness for Behavior Change. Demographic differences in symptom screening and readiness to change (yes/no) were assessed using t-tests (age) and Chi-Square or Fishers Exact tests (race, ethnicity, gender). Symptom burden by readiness to change status was assessed using Chi-Square tests.

Results

Of the 390 patients who met eligibility criteria (mean age 59 years, 45% females, 15% Black, and 32% American Indian/Alaska Native, 29% Hispanic), 303 (78%) displayed at least one clinically significant symptom - pain, fatigue, or depression. Of those experiencing symptoms, 39% reported experiencing 1 clinically significant symptom, 35% reported 2, and 26% reported 3. There were no statistically significant differences by age, race, ethnicity, or gender in those reporting symptoms versus those who were not, or those ready to seek treatment (80%) versus those not ready to seek treatment (20%). Of those who were experiencing symptoms, the percentage of patients willing to receive treatment increased as the number of symptoms increased (71%, 86% and 90% willing to receive treatment with 1, 2 or 3 symptoms respectively, p<.01).

Conclusion

The majority of HD patients report experiencing at least one clinically significant symptom and experiencing more of these symptoms increased readiness to seek treatment. Demographic difference in symptom burden and readiness for treatment were not evident in this sample and should continue to be the focus of additional research.

Funding

  • NIDDK Support