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Abstract: PO1737

Changes over Time in DASH Diet Accordance by Racial/Ethnic Groups Among US Adults

Session Information

Category: Health Maintenance, Nutrition, and Metabolism

  • 1300 Health Maintenance, Nutrition, and Metabolism

Authors

  • Banerjee, Tanushree, University of California San Francisco, San Francisco, California, United States
  • Mcculloch, Charles E., University of California San Francisco, San Francisco, California, United States
  • Crews, Deidra C., Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, Maryland, United States
  • Burrows, Nilka Rios, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Atlanta, Georgia, United States
  • Koyama, Alain, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Atlanta, Georgia, United States
  • Morgenstern, Hal, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan, United States
  • Saran, Rajiv, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan, United States
  • Powe, Neil R., University of California San Francisco, San Francisco, California, United States
Background

Recommendations for healthy dietary patterns may vary for individuals with and without CKD. Racial/ethnic disparities in dietary quality exist, yet there is limited understanding of how dietary patterns have changed over years in different racial/ethnic groups. We examined trends in accordance to a Dietary Approaches to Stop Hypertension (DASH) diet by different racial/ethnic groups in adults with and without CKD.

Methods

We used data from the 2003-2018 NHANES to estimate the prevalence of DASH diet accordance among individuals aged≥20 years with CKD (ACR≥30mg/g or eGFR 15-59 ml/min) and no-CKD by racial/ethnic group. Self-reported race/ethnicity was categorized as non-Hispanic White (NHW), non-Hispanic Black (NHB), Mexican American (MA), or other. Change in diet composition over 16 years was assessed with a DASH diet agreement score with the years collapsed into 2003-06, 2007-10, 2011-14, 2015-18. We calculated the score based on 9 target nutrients by coding each as 1 for met and 0 for not met and summing to a total score of 9. Lowest tertile of the score was considered poor accordance. Prevalence rates were estimated for racial/ethnic groups after age-standardizing to the 2010 US Census data. Time trends in age-adjusted DASH diet prevalence were assessed using logistic regression with time interval as a predictor.

Results

Overall, the prevalence of poor accordance to a DASH diet was 13.5% and 17.5% in adults with CKD and no-CKD. Throughout the period, the age-adjusted prevalence of poor accordance was higher in NHB with CKD (prevalence did not change significantly, Figure) than in NHB with no-CKD. For MA, a significant change in prevalence was noted among no-CKD (ptrend=0.008), but not in those with CKD.

Conclusion

Poor accordance to a DASH diet was greater in adults with no-CKD. However, prevalence of poor accordance did not change in NHB and MA with CKD. Efforts to further improve promotion and accordance to DASH diets may help address CKD progression and health disparities in the US.

Funding

  • Other U.S. Government Support