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Kidney Week

Abstract: PO0835

Latinx Patients' Perspectives on Their Kidney Disease Education and Recommendations for Improvement: A Qualitative Study

Session Information

Category: Dialysis

  • 701 Dialysis: Hemodialysis and Frequent Dialysis

Authors

  • Novick, Tessa Kimberly, The University of Texas at Austin Dell Medical School, Austin, Texas, United States
  • Diaz, Santiago, The University of Texas at Austin Dell Medical School, Austin, Texas, United States
  • Choudhary, Kavyaa D., The University of Texas at Austin Dell Medical School, Austin, Texas, United States
  • Cubas, Doris A., The University of Texas at Austin Dell Medical School, Austin, Texas, United States
  • Barrios, Francisco A., The University of Texas at Austin Dell Medical School, Austin, Texas, United States
  • Cervantes, Lilia, University of Colorado, Denver, Colorado, United States
  • Jacobs, Elizabeth A., Maine Medical Center - Scarborough Campus, Scarborough, Maine, United States
Background

In most states, Latinx immigrants with kidney failure receive dialysis in acute care settings on an emergency-only basis. What and how much kidney disease education they receive, and how to improve kidney disease education and outreach among Latinx populations is unknown. The objective of this study was to understand the kidney disease educational gaps of Latinx individuals who need but lack access to scheduled outpatient dialysis.

Methods

We conducted a qualitative, semi-structured interview study in a Texas hospital system from March 2020 to January 2021 with 15 individuals who received emergency-only dialysis when they were first diagnosed with kidney failure. We collected demographic information, and performed thematic analysis using the constant comparative method on interviews after they were audio-recorded, translated and transcribed verbatim.

Results

All 15 persons interviewed (60% male; mean age 51 years) identified as Hispanic (73% Mexican), and none reported knowing about their kidney disease more than 6 months before starting dialysis. The themes were: 1) lack of kidney disease awareness; 2) education provided was incomplete and poor quality; 3) lack of culturally concordant communication and care; 4) elements Latinx patients receiving emergency-only dialysis want in their education; 5) facilitators of patient activation and coping; and 6) Latinx patient recommendations to improve community outreach.

Conclusion

Latinx adults receiving emergency-only dialysis are usually unaware of their kidney disease until shortly before or after they start dialysis, and the education they receive is poor quality, and often not culturally tailored. Participants made feasible recommendations on how to improve education and outreach among Latinx communities.