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Kidney Week

Abstract: PO1443

Development of Kidney Resident and Recruited Macrophages

Session Information

Category: Glomerular Diseases

  • 1202 Glomerular Diseases: Immunology and Inflammation

Authors

  • Steers, Nicholas J., Columbia University Irving Medical Center, New York, New York, United States
  • Liang, Judy, Columbia University Irving Medical Center, New York, New York, United States
  • Stevens, Kelsey O., Columbia University Irving Medical Center, New York, New York, United States
  • Mo, Anna, Columbia University Irving Medical Center, New York, New York, United States
  • Mendelsohn, Cathy L., Columbia University Irving Medical Center, New York, New York, United States
  • Barasch, Jonathan M., Columbia University Irving Medical Center, New York, New York, United States
  • Gharavi, Ali G., Columbia University Irving Medical Center, New York, New York, United States
Background

Macrophages are part of the phagocyte mononuclear system constantly replaced by the circulating blood monocytes. In the steady state, the myeloid cell compartment is highly heterogenous, and contains cells of different origins and functions. These cells include macrophages and dendritic cells, and each play important roles in tissue maintenance, including development, homeostasis, immunity and repair following tissue injury. The composition of kidney macrophages is not well known.

Methods

A multi-parameter flow cytometry approach was used to identify the resident and recruited macrophage population in the kidneys of male and female C57BL/6J mice aged -7, -21 and -84 days in the steady state. Resident and recruited macrophage populations were characterized based on 33 cell surface and intracellular markers.

Results

Both resident and recruited macrophages were identified in the kidneys of male and female mice aged -7, -21 and -84 days in the steady state. We observed two distinct resident macrophage populations in young mice (7 and 21 days old) but by 84-days, male and female mice displayed 4 and 5 resident populations, respectively. The resident macrophage population in 7-day old mice displayed low surface expression of MHC class II and began to shift to an increased expression of MHC class II at 21 days, and high MHC class II expression at 84 days. We detected three recruited macrophage populations in 7- and 21-day-old mice, and two populations by 84-days of age. The recruited macrophage population displayed low MHC class II at all ages in both sexes. Analysis of the global macrophage populations at 84 days of age revealed female mice had twice as many recruited compared to resident macrophages, whereas male mice had an equal distribution.

Conclusion

The data indicate a dynamic change in the kidney macrophage population, leading to an activated resident macrophage phenotype. The composition of macrophage populations also differs by sex and age. These data suggest each population plays a role in kidney homeostasis. Future studies will be directed towards elucidating the functions of each of the identified macrophage populations.

Funding

  • NIDDK Support