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Kidney Week

Abstract: PO1002

Psychosocial Impact of COVID-19 Pandemic on Patients with ESKD on Peritoneal Dialysis

Session Information

  • Peritoneal Dialysis
    November 04, 2021 | Location: On-Demand, Virtual Only
    Abstract Time: 10:00 AM - 12:00 PM

Category: Dialysis

  • 702 Dialysis: Home Dialysis and Peritoneal Dialysis

Authors

  • Cha, Jin Joo, Korea University Ansan Hospital, Ansan, Gyeonggi-do, Korea (the Republic of)
  • Park, Booyeun, Korea University Ansan Hospital, Ansan, Gyeonggi-do, Korea (the Republic of)
  • Yoon, Sung Gi, Korea University Ansan Hospital, Ansan, Gyeonggi-do, Korea (the Republic of)
  • Cha, Dae R., Korea University Ansan Hospital, Ansan, Gyeonggi-do, Korea (the Republic of)
  • Kang, Young Sun, Korea University Ansan Hospital, Ansan, Gyeonggi-do, Korea (the Republic of)
Background

The mortality rate from COVID-19 is remarkably high in elderly patients and those with chronic conditions. Increases in physical and mental stress among patients with chronic conditions, especially end-stage kidney disease, were expected to have occurred in response to the COVID-19 pandemic. This study reports that the psychosocial impact of the COVID-19 pandemic on patients receiving peritoneal dialysis.

Methods

During the pandemic, we surveyed the mental health of patients with end-stage kidney disease on peritoneal dialysis at a single center. Depression using with BDI scoring was evaluated and then compared in peritoneal dialysis patients between before and the pandemic declaration. We also surveyed patient satisfaction with the self-care services associated with peritoneal dialysis under the pandemic period.

Results

One-third of the survey respondents (n=176) were moderately to extremely worried about their physical health being impacted by the pandemic, while 20% moderately to extremely worried about their mental and emotional health being impacted. About half of participant reported feeling that they were unable to handle their personal problems and that things were out of their control. However, most felt that they could retain control over the important things and overcome their difficulties. Despite COVID-19 pandemic, no significant changes in depression scores were apparent between before and during the pandemic. Most participants were satisfied with the in-home self-care services delivered by either telephone or remote monitoring.

Conclusion

Many participants reported that they were afraid of COVID-19, but most patients with PD felt that they could overcome the crisis. The COVID-19 pandemic did not affect the depression of patients receiving peritoneal dialysis.