ASN's Mission

ASN leads the fight to prevent, treat, and cure kidney diseases throughout the world by educating health professionals and scientists, advancing research and innovation, communicating new knowledge, and advocating for the highest quality care for patients.

learn more

Contact ASN

1401 H St, NW, Ste 900, Washington, DC 20005

email@asn-online.org

202-640-4660

The Latest on Twitter

Kidney Week

Abstract: PO2315

Impact of Dietary Beta-Carotene on All-Cause Mortality According to Different Clinical Conditions, Including Decreased Kidney Function

Session Information

Category: CKD (Non-Dialysis)

  • 2101 CKD (Non-Dialysis): Epidemiology, Risk Factors, and Prevention

Authors

  • Kim, Yaerim, Keimyung University School of Medicine, Daegu, Daegu, Korea (the Republic of)
  • Ha, Kyungho, Jeju National University, Jeju, Jeju, Korea (the Republic of)
  • Lee, Jeonghwan, Seoul National University Seoul Metropolitan Government Boramae Medical Center, Dongjak-gu, Seoul, Korea (the Republic of)
  • Park, Jae Yoon, Dongguk University Ilsan Hospital, Goyang, Gyeonggi-do, Korea (the Republic of)
  • Yoo, Kyung Don, Ulsan University Hospital, Ulsan, Korea (the Republic of)
  • Kim, Yong Chul, Seoul National University Hospital, Jongno-gu, Seoul, Korea (the Republic of)
  • Paek, Jin hyuk, Keimyung University School of Medicine, Daegu, Daegu, Korea (the Republic of)
  • Park, Woo Yeong, Keimyung University School of Medicine, Daegu, Daegu, Korea (the Republic of)
  • Jin, Kyubok, Keimyung University School of Medicine, Daegu, Daegu, Korea (the Republic of)
  • Han, Seungyeup, Keimyung University School of Medicine, Daegu, Daegu, Korea (the Republic of)
  • Kim, Dong Ki, Seoul National University Hospital, Jongno-gu, Seoul, Korea (the Republic of)
  • Joo, Kwon Wook, Seoul National University Hospital, Jongno-gu, Seoul, Korea (the Republic of)
  • Lim, Chun Soo, Seoul National University Seoul Metropolitan Government Boramae Medical Center, Dongjak-gu, Seoul, Korea (the Republic of)
  • Lee, Jung Pyo, Seoul National University Seoul Metropolitan Government Boramae Medical Center, Dongjak-gu, Seoul, Korea (the Republic of)
Background

Beta-carotene has been announced that was inversely associated with the risk of all-cause mortality, but the association in the subgroup was not clear yet. Herein, we aimed to evaluate the impact of beta-carotene on all-cause mortality according to the different clinical settings among the general population.

Methods

We used employing data from the 92,062 subjects of US National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey 1999-2015. The intake of beta-carotene was divided into the quartile; the first quartile group was regarded as the reference. The subgroup was made by 1) the presence of hypertension, 2) diabetes, 3) the status of alcohol consumption, 4) smoking status, and 5) estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) 90 mL/min/1.73m2, respectively. We used a multivariate Cox-proportional hazard model to identify the impact of beta-carotene on all-cause mortality.

Results

A total of 36,747 subjects were finally included in the study. There were 14,469 (39.4%), 4,704 (12.8%), and 15,804 (43.0%) subjects with hypertension, diabetes, and eGFR <90 mL/min/1.73m2, respectively. There were 8,774 (23.9%) of ex-smokers and 13,694 (37.3%) of non-alcoholics, respectively. During 97.9±53.9 months, there were 4,465 (12.2%) death were detected. After adjusted with multivariable, greater intake of beta-carotene significantly reduced the risk for all-cause mortality in subjects without hypertension (adjusted hazard ratio [aHR] 0.81, 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.66-0.99 in 4th quartile group [Q4]), without diabetes (aHR 0.85, 95% CI 0.75-0.96 in Q4), non-alcoholics (aHR 0.86, 95% CI 0.74-0.99 in Q4), and ex-smokers (aHR 0.79, 95% CI 0.66-0.93 in Q4), respectively. On the contrary, according to the eGFR, participants with eGFR <90 mL/min/1.73 m2 had a beneficial effect of dietary beta-carotene (aHR 0.82, 95% CI, 0.73-0.93 in Q4) compared to the participants with eGFR ≥90 mL/1.73 m2 (aHR 1.00, 95% CI, 0.78-1.27).

Conclusion

Among the various medical conditions, decreased kidney function status was the only condition to predict the beneficial effect of dietary beta-carotene. More specified and targeted counseling for encouraging intake of beta-carotene needs to be considered especially for subjects with lower eGFR.