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Kidney Week

Abstract: PO1931

Percutaneous Kidney Biopsy in Outpatient Setting: Can I Go Home Now?

Session Information

Category: Pathology and Lab Medicine

  • 1600 Pathology and Lab Medicine

Authors

  • Zariat, Asheen, Allegheny General Hospital - Western Pennsylvania Hospital Medical Education Consortium, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, United States
  • Kumar, Ameet, Allegheny General Hospital - Western Pennsylvania Hospital Medical Education Consortium, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, United States
  • Palombo, Tyler Michael, Drexel University, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, United States
  • Ravipati, Prasanti S., Drexel University, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, United States
  • Thompson, Diane Vido, Allegheny General Hospital - Western Pennsylvania Hospital Medical Education Consortium, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, United States
  • Nashar, Khaled, Allegheny General Hospital - Western Pennsylvania Hospital Medical Education Consortium, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, United States
  • Arora, Swati, Allegheny General Hospital - Western Pennsylvania Hospital Medical Education Consortium, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, United States
Background

Kidney biopsies are a key diagnostic tool in renal dysfunction; however, complications ranging from bleeding to hematoma requiring embolization can occur. There is conflicting evidence on how long to keep patients post-biopsy. Some studies show 100% of serious complications occur within 8 hours, while others show that one-third can occur after 8 hours. Shorter observation periods prevent unnecessary testing and help reduce healthcare costs. Our study aims to assess if patients can be safely discharged with a six hour observation period post-biopsy.

Methods

Single-center retrospective Quality Improvement (QI) study of patients undergoing outpatient percutaneous native kidney biopsy over last 5 years (n=177) divided into 2 groups:
-Group A: Same-day discharge after
-Group B: 23-hour observation after US-guided biopsy by Urology

Outcomes compared included timing of hemoglobin (Hb) drop post-procedure, readmission rates, need for transfusions, imaging or interventions.

Results

Of 177 patients, 75 (42.3%) were in Group A and 102 (57.6%) in Group B. Drop in Hb and post-biopsy complications were not significantly different between the groups. Three patients had bleeding complications, two of which required transfusion (Table). All three patients with bleeding complications had >10% Hb drop within first 6 hours post-biopsy. No readmissions related to biopsy occurred.

Conclusion

There were no major complications in either group. This QI study suggests that the majority of asymptomatic patients can be safely discharged at 6 hrs post-biopsy if Hb is stable. This could help reduce healthcare costs and burden to patients. This is a limited single center study: further larger studies are needed to confirm this.

Bleeding Complications Post-Kidney Biopsy