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Abstract: PO1726

Alteration of Intestinal Microbiota in Patients with ESRD Undergoing Hemodialysis

Session Information

Category: Health Maintenance, Nutrition, and Metabolism

  • 1300 Health Maintenance, Nutrition, and Metabolism

Authors

  • Koshida, Takeo, Department of Nephrology, Juntendo University Faculty of Medicine, Tokyo, Japan
  • Gohda, Tomohito, Department of Nephrology, Juntendo University Faculty of Medicine, Tokyo, Japan
  • Sugimoto, Takuya, Yakult Central Institute, Yakult Honsha Co. Ltd, Tokyo, Japan
  • Asahara, Takashi, Yakult Central Institute, Yakult Honsha Co. Ltd, Tokyo, Japan
  • Ishizaka, Masanori, Department of Nephrology, Juntendo University Faculty of Medicine, Tokyo, Japan
  • Murakoshi, Maki, Department of Nephrology, Juntendo University Faculty of Medicine, Tokyo, Japan
  • Suzuki, Yusuke, Department of Nephrology, Juntendo University Faculty of Medicine, Tokyo, Japan
Background

The alteration in the intestinal microbiota is reported to be associated with various diseases, indicating that the development and progression of end-stage kidney disease also might be associated with dysbiosis.

Methods

The stool samples were collected from patients with hemodialysis (n = 41, HD group) and those with normal renal function (n = 40, NRF group). Both groups are comprised of patients with (HD_DM, n = 20; NRF_DM, n = 19) and without diabetes (HD_non-DM, n = 21; NRF_non-DM, n = 21). We conducted 16S rRNA gene amplicon sequencing using stool samples to analyze the intestinal microbiota.

Results

The reduced abundance of the genera Megamonas and Fusicatenibacter, and the enriched abundance of the genera Family_XIII_AD3011_group (Anaerovoracaceae family), UBA_1819 (Ruminococcaceae family), and Pseudomonas in the stool samples of HD patients were observed significantly compared with those of NRF patients. Compared with patients with NRF_DM, the relative abundance of the genera Megamonas was decreased and that of Family_XIII_AD3011_group was increased significantly in patients with HD_DM, although those relative abundance did not alter between NRF_non-DM and HD_non-DM. The relative abundance of the genera Suterella in HD_non-DM was significantly decreased than that in NRF_non-DM, although that relative abundance did not differ between NRF_DM and HD_DM. In the microbial beta diversity, there was no difference between NRF_DM and NRF_non-DM by weighted and unweighted Unifrac analysis, however, there was significant difference between HD_DM and HD_non-DM by unweighted Unifrac analysis (p = 0.007). These results suggest that the gut microbiota alters with renal function decline, and varies depending on the presence or absence of diabetes.

Conclusion

The intestinal microbiota might be varied substantially depending on renal function and the presence or absence of diabetes.