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Kidney Week

Abstract: PO2137

Preeclampsia and Kidney Transplant: Offspring and Mother Outcomes in a Single-Center Cohort in the West of Mexico

Session Information

Category: Transplantation

  • 1902 Transplantation: Clinical

Authors

  • Aguilar, Arantxa Karina, Instituto Mexicano del Seguro Social, Guadalajara, Jalisco, Mexico
  • Elias Lopez, Marcos Adrian, Instituto Mexicano del Seguro Social, Guadalajara, Jalisco, Mexico
  • Villegas Gutierrez, Luz Yareli, Instituto Mexicano del Seguro Social, Guadalajara, Jalisco, Mexico
  • Rico sánchez, Jesús Alejandro, Instituto Mexicano del Seguro Social, Guadalajara, Jalisco, Mexico
  • Garcia Rivera, Alejandro, Instituto Mexicano del Seguro Social, Guadalajara, Jalisco, Mexico
  • Katia yuritzi, Ríos Cornejo, Instituto Mexicano del Seguro Social, Guadalajara, Jalisco, Mexico
  • Rojas-Campos, Enrique, Instituto Mexicano del Seguro Social, Guadalajara, Jalisco, Mexico
  • Parra Michel, Renato, Instituto Mexicano del Seguro Social, Guadalajara, Jalisco, Mexico
Background

Pregnancy in a kidney transplant recipient (KTR) is possible and safe after a 1-2 year post transplantation, stable serum creatinine (<1.5 mg/dl), controlled or no hypertension, proteinuria in 24 hours <500 mg and stable immunosuppressive levels. Preeclampsia is a common complication in KTR pregnant women associated to worse maternal and offspring outcomes, there is scarce available information this topic in a KTR in Latin America

Methods

Retrospective cohort study from October 2018 to April 2021 included 18 patients: >18 years who got pregnant after KT. Serum creatinine (SCr), proteinuria before, during pregnancy and after delivery, the presence of hypertension before pregnancy, episodes of kidney graft rejections, immunosuppressant therapy, and preeclampsia were recorded from medical chart, and compared it to the offspring’s gestational age, weight, APGAR score, NICU requirement and NICU stay.

Results

The frequency of preeclampsia was 33%, none of them were diagnosed with hypertension before pregnancy. Three women died after delivering (no obstetric associated), 1 lost graft function (in PD). SCr was higher during pregnancy and after delivery, offspring’s gestational age was lower, offspring’s weight was considerably lower, as well as APGAR score in women with preeclampsia, all NICU requirement were in children whose mother had preeclampsia and they had a NICU media stay of 19 days. In a logistic regression analysis, preeclampsia is a risk factor to a lower APGAR SCORE (p<0.001), requirement of NICU (p=0.001) and NICU stay. Other results are shown in the table.

Conclusion

Age, time between KT and pregnancy, gestational age, hypertension, serum creatinine, cesarean delivery was not different among preeclampsia, compared to the control group. Children from preeclamptic women tend to have lower weight and had lower apgar score and higher NICU requirement.

Funding

  • Government Support – Non-U.S.