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Kidney Week

Abstract: PO0740

Diabetes Mellitus Associates with Differences in the Metabolome of Patients with CKD

Session Information

Category: Diabetic Kidney Disease

  • 602 Diabetic Kidney Disease: Clinical

Authors

  • Sun, Mingyao, The University of Iowa Roy J and Lucille A Carver College of Medicine, Iowa City, Iowa, United States
  • Ten eyck, Patrick, Institute for Clinical and Translational Science, Iowa City, Iowa, United States
  • Hines, Nicole Grace, The University of Iowa Roy J and Lucille A Carver College of Medicine, Iowa City, Iowa, United States
  • Buchanan, Jane, University of Iowa, Department of Molecular Physiology and Biophysics, Iowa City, Iowa, United States
  • Taylor, Eric, University of Iowa, Department of Molecular Physiology and Biophysics, Iowa City, Iowa, United States
  • Jalal, Diana I., The University of Iowa Roy J and Lucille A Carver College of Medicine, Iowa City, Iowa, United States
Background

Diabetic Mellitus (DM), the most common cause of chronic kidney disease (CKD), is associated with increased risk of death, cardiovascular disease, and kidney failure even if the DM is well-controlled. We hypothesized that significant differences exist in the metabolome of CKD patients with well-controlled DM as compared to CKD patients without DM.

Methods

Gas chromatography mass spectrometry (GC-MS) was used to perform serum metabolomic analysis of 46 subjects (28 CKD with DM and 18 CKD without DM). Unpaired t-tests were performed to compare metabolites between the 2 groups and Spearman correlation was utilized to evaluate the potential correlation between the metabolites and measures of kidney function. MetaboAnalyst (V5.0) was utilized to identify metabolic pathways that differed between those with or without DM.

Results

In the subjects with CKD and DM, the mean(SD) hemoglobin A1C was 7.11(1.8) vs 5.5(1.4) in those with CKD but without DM. Of the 90 metabolites detected by GC-MS, 17 differential metabolites were significantly altered in the CKD with DM vs CKD without DM groups (p≤0.10). MetaboAnalyst indicated galactose metabolism, glycerolipid metabolism, starch and sucrose metabolism, fructose and mannose degradation, and fatty acid biosynthesis are the top differential pathways between both groups. In those with CKD and DM, citrate correlated with estimated glomerular filtration rate (GFR) (r=0.42, p=0.031) and homoserine and glycerol correlated with ACR (r=0.42, p=0.048 and r=0.42, p=0.044, respectively).

Conclusion

We have identified significant differences in the metabolome of CKD patients with well-controlled DM compared to those without DM. Further research is needed to evaluate the potential role of these metabolic pathways and if they contribute to the high morbidity and mortality burden in CKD patients with DM.

Funding

  • NIDDK Support