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Kidney Week

Abstract: PO2151

Outcomes of Kidney Referrals from Donors with High Infection Risk in the Most Populous Donor-Specific Antibody

Session Information

Category: Transplantation

  • 1902 Transplantation: Clinical

Authors

  • Hussain, Mohammad Ahraz, University of California Los Angeles David Geffen School of Medicine, Los Angeles, California, United States
  • Homkrailas, Piyavadee, University of California Los Angeles David Geffen School of Medicine, Los Angeles, California, United States
  • Danovitch, Gabriel M., University of California Los Angeles David Geffen School of Medicine, Los Angeles, California, United States
  • Bunnapradist, Suphamai, University of California Los Angeles David Geffen School of Medicine, Los Angeles, California, United States
Background

Overdose-death donors (ODD) increased from 1.1% of donors in 2000 to 13.4% in 2017. Kidneys from ODDs were discarded at a higher rate than trauma-death donors. US Public Health Service defines organs from individuals with opioid abuse as being at increased risk of infection with HIV, HepB and HepC. CAOP is the most populous DSA in the country and improving utilization of organs within the DSA is of great importance. We aimed to study the utilization of kidneys from High-Infectious Risk Donors in this DSA.

Methods

We obtained data from UNOS and the Organ Procurement Organization (OPO), One Legacy between January 2015 and September 2020. We calculated the organ decline rate, organ refusal rate and rate of organs refused under the UNOS organ refusal code Donor age/quality and Donor Social History. We also compare these results to the trauma-death donors.

Results

Out of 2686 kidneys that were considered for recovery, 382 kidneys were from ODDs between 2015 and September 2020. 109 ODD kidneys (22.6%) were shared and successfully transplanted. 51 ODD kidneys were discarded locally in the DSA (22.2%). 47.5 % were refused by centers due to “Donor Age, Quality and Social History” before being either transplanted or being discarded. 103 kidneys of the ODDs were not recovered or offered for transplant. 82 kidneys were recovered from Hepatitis C positive donors, out of which 52 (66.7%) were shared and transplanted outside the DSA and 15 were discarded locally.

Conclusion

Higher infectious risk increased risk donors were being shared and discarded at a high rate. Given we have more evidence that these higher infectious risk kidneys are transplantable efforts to improve their utilization are needed.

Funding

  • Private Foundation Support