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Abstract: PO2407

Health-Related Quality of Life and Depression Score Differences in Brazilian and US CKD Patients

Session Information

Category: CKD (Non-Dialysis)

  • 2102 CKD (Non-Dialysis): Clinical, Outcomes, and Trials

Authors

  • Yang, Danwen, Yale University School of Medicine, New Haven, Connecticut, United States
  • Henn, Lisa, Arbor Research Collaborative for Health, Ann Arbor, Michigan, United States
  • Muenz, Daniel G., Arbor Research Collaborative for Health, Ann Arbor, Michigan, United States
  • Bieber, Brian, Arbor Research Collaborative for Health, Ann Arbor, Michigan, United States
  • Lopes, Antonio Alberto, Universidade Federal da Bahia, Salvador, BA, Brazil
  • Speyer, Elodie, INSERM, Paris, Île-de-France, France
  • Robinson, Bruce M., Arbor Research Collaborative for Health, Ann Arbor, Michigan, United States
  • Pecoits-Filho, Roberto, Arbor Research Collaborative for Health, Ann Arbor, Michigan, United States
  • Pisoni, Ronald L., Arbor Research Collaborative for Health, Ann Arbor, Michigan, United States
  • Finkelstein, Fredric O., Yale University School of Medicine, New Haven, Connecticut, United States
Background

CKD patients suffer from many issues, increasing in prevalence and severity as disease progresses, that may affect their perceptions of health-related quality of life (HRQOL) and increase depression symptoms (DS). A patient-centered care approach including systematic assessment of self-reported HRQOL and DS as CKD progresses facilitates tailoring the treatment to individual patient concerns. This study examines the relationship at baseline between CKD stage and patient responses to the KDQOL-36 and CESD-10.

Methods

We studied 1901 CKDOPPS participants (629 Stage 3, 1009 Stage 4, and 263 Stage 5) from Brazil (n=598) and the U.S. (n=1310). Patients at different CKD stages at study selection were compared for differences at baseline in scores of DS (CESD-10 [Kohout], higher score worse, max 40) and HRQOL (KDQOL-36, higher score better, each scale max 100). The KDQOL-36 yields the Physical Component Summary (PCS) and Mental Component Summary (MCS) from the SF-12v1; Burden of Kidney Disease (BKD); Symptoms of Kidney Disease (SKD); and Effects of Kidney Disease (EKD). The Kruskal-Wallis Test assessed differences among groups.

Results

Patients’ mean age, albumin, and BP did not differ in the 3 CKD groups. Mean Hb was lower for CKD 5 (10.8) and 4 (11.9) than for CKD 3 (12.7) patients, but only slight mean difference occurred in DS and MCS by CKD stage. Mean PCS score was 39.8 and 37.9 in CKD 3 and 5 respectively. The largest mean difference in HRQOL scores by CKD stage was for BKD: 77.7 in CKD 3, 69.4 in CKD 4, and 58.0 in CKD 5 (p < 0.0001). Lower HRQOL scores for more advanced CKD stage occurred for EKD: (85.13, 79.7, and 76.0 in CKD 3, 4, and 5, p<.0001) and SKD (79.95, 77.8, 77.1, p=0.0007). Compared to U.S. patients, those in Brazil had higher PCS scores (40.1 vs 37.5) but lower BKD scores (62.3 vs 74.4); other scores did not differ by country.

Conclusion

HRQOL baseline scores for CKD patients show a greater difference in the BKD scores; differences by CKD stage were not seen in MCS and CESD-10 scores; and minimal difference occurred for PCS scores. These results potentially can help address patients’ problems and concerns at different CKD stages.

Funding

  • Other U.S. Government Support