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Abstract: FR-PO433

Association of Early Life Growth and Kidney Function With Blood Pressure in Ethiopian Children: Birth Cohort Study (IABC)

Session Information

  • Pediatric Nephrology - I
    November 04, 2022 | Location: Exhibit Hall, Orange County Convention Center‚ West Building
    Abstract Time: 10:00 AM - 12:00 PM

Category: Pediatric Nephrology

  • 1800 Pediatric Nephrology

Authors

  • Bogale, Daniel Yilma, Jimma University, Jimma, Ethiopia
  • Tefera, Beakal Zinab, Jimma University, Jimma, Ethiopia
  • Abagero, Rahma Ali, Jimma University, Jimma, Ethiopia
  • Megersa, Bikila Soboka, Kobenhavns Universitet, Kobenhavn, Denmark
  • Abera, Mubarek, Jimma University, Jimma, Ethiopia
  • Wibaek, Rasmus, Steno Diabetes Center Copenhagen, Herlev, Denmark
  • Andersen, Gregers Stig, Steno Diabetes Center Copenhagen, Herlev, Denmark
  • Nigatu, Tsinuel Girma, Jimma University, Jimma, Ethiopia
  • Friis, Henrik, Kobenhavns Universitet, Kobenhavn, Denmark
  • Wells, Jonathan Ck, University College London, London, United Kingdom
  • Nitsch, Dorothea, London School of Hygiene & Tropical Medicine, London, United Kingdom

Group or Team Name

  • IABC-Kidney study Team
Background

The prevalence of hypertension is increasing in low and middle-income countries (LMIC). Studies in high-income countries have indicated the association of early life growth with hypertension later in life; but limited studies have examined this in LMIC. We examined the associations of low birth weight (LBW), linear growth in first five years of life, and kidney function with blood pressure (BP) at 7-11 years in Ethiopian children.

Methods

Children from birth cohort were followed up at age 7-11years. Sociodemographic, anthropometric, and body composition data, and blood samples were collected. BP was measured three times five minutes apart and average was taken. Kidney function was assessed using estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) using cystatin C. Term neonates with a birth weight <2.5 Kg were considered as LBW. Linear growth was assessed using height/length-for-age (HAZ) using WHO reference data and stunting was defined as HAZ <-2 . Associations of LBW, HAZ and stunting (yes/no) at 2, 4, and 5 years and kidney function with BP were evaluated in separate linear regression models with adjustment for age, sex, fat mass and fat-free mass, height at current age.

Results

A total of 355 children participated in the current follow-up (mean age ± SD: 9 ± 1 year, boys: 51.3%). The median (IQR) systolic and diastolic BP was 93 (90, 100) mmHg and 60 (50, 60) mmHg respectively. Kidney function was assessed for 347 children and median (IQR) eGFR was 76 (70, 84) ml/min/1.73 m2. For every unit increase in HAZ at 2 year, there was 1% (95%CI: 0.4, 2) decrease in systolic BP at 7-11 years of age. Children who were stunted at 2 year had 3% (95%CI: 0.4, 5) higher in systolic BP compared to non-stunted children. We found no association between LBW, HAZ at 4 and 5 years and BP. We found 0.04% (95%CI: 0.01, 0.07) decrease in systolic BP per 1 ml/min/1.73 increase in eGFR.

Conclusion

Our findings from healthy Ethiopian children revealed that linear growth at two years of life and eGFR inversely associated with systolic BP at 7-11 years of age. Further follow up of this cohort during the adolescent and adulthood period will help to understand the association of early-life linear growth with hypertension in LMIC.

Funding

  • Commercial Support