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Abstract: SA-PO912

High-Density Lipoprotein Lipidomics Across the Spectrum of Kidney Dysfunction

Session Information

Category: CKD (Non-Dialysis)

  • 2202 CKD (Non-Dialysis): Clinical‚ Outcomes‚ and Trials

Authors

  • Lidgard, Benjamin, University of Washington, Seattle, Washington, United States
  • Hoofnagle, Andrew N., University of Washington, Seattle, Washington, United States
  • Zelnick, Leila R., University of Washington, Seattle, Washington, United States
  • Kestenbaum, Bryan R., University of Washington, Seattle, Washington, United States
  • de Boer, Ian H., University of Washington, Seattle, Washington, United States
  • Robinson-Cohen, Cassianne, Vanderbilt University, Nashville, Tennessee, United States
  • Fretts, Amanda M., University of Washington, Seattle, Washington, United States
  • Lemaitre, Rozenn, University of Washington, Seattle, Washington, United States
  • Bansal, Nisha, University of Washington, Seattle, Washington, United States
Background

Patients with CKD are known to have dysfunctional high-density lipoprotein (HDL), with impaired cholesterol efflux and anti-inflammatory properties. Differences in the lipid composition of HDL particles in these patients may in part be responsible for these impaired functions.

Methods

We studied 499 CKD participants from the Seattle Kidney Study. In each participant, HDL was isolated from serum, and targeted lipidomics were used to quantify amounts of ceramides, sphingomyelins, and phosphatidylcholines composing HDL. We evaluated the cross-sectional associations of estimated GFR (modeled continuously, per 15-point decrement) and natural log-adjusted albuminuria with individual lipids and lipid classes using multiple linear regression, adjusting for confounding characteristics and accounting for multiple comparisons at a false discovery rate of 5%.

Results

After adjustment, eGFR was not significantly associated with classes of lipids or individual lipids present in HDL. In contrast, natural log-transformed albuminuria was significantly associated with higher HDL levels of ceramides, short-chain sphingomyelins, glucosylceramide 16:0, sphingomyelin 16:0, and phosphatidylcholine 30:1 (Figures).

Conclusion

Albuminuria, but not eGFR, was significantly associated with specific alterations in the lipid composition of HDL in participants with HDL. Further studies investigating the functional consequences of these differences are warranted.

Funding

  • NIDDK Support