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Abstract: SA-PO825

Associations Between Visceral Obesity and Renal Impairment in Medical Checkup Participants

Session Information

Category: Health Maintenance, Nutrition, and Metabolism

  • 1300 Health Maintenance, Nutrition, and Metabolism

Authors

  • Miyasato, Yoshikazu, The University of Tokyo, Tokyo, Japan
  • Oba, Koji, The University of Tokyo, Tokyo, Japan
  • Yasuno, Shinji, The Jikei University School of Medicine, Tokyo, Japan
  • Matsuyama, Yutaka, The University of Tokyo, Tokyo, Japan
  • Masuda, Izuru, Takeda Hospital, Kyoto, Japan
Background


Obesity has been reported to be a risk factor for chronic kidney disease, which is now considered one of the most important public health issues worldwide. We aimed to evaluate the relationships between obesity indicators (visceral fat area [VFA], body mass index [BMI], waist circumference, waist-to-height ratio, and visceral-to-subcutaneous fat ratio [VSR]) and changes in kidney function and the risk of proteinuria, and to determine the most sensitive obesity indicator to predict a decline in kidney function and new-onset proteinuria.

Methods


Design: Retrospective cohort study.
Setting: Routine medical check-up program at two Japanese hospitals.
Participants: Subjects who underwent VFA measurements during medical checkups in 2012 at Takeda Hospital Group Medical Examination Centers were included. The follow-up period was from April 2012 to March 2018.
Exposures: Obesity was defined using a separate baseline value of each indicator: VFA (≥100 cm2), BMI (≥25 kg/m2), waist circumference (≥85 cm for men and ≥90 cm for women), waist-to-height ratio (≥0.5), and VSR (≥0.4).
Main outcomes measures: Changes in estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFRcr) and time to new-onset proteinuria were measured.
Statistical analysis: The relationships between obesity indicators and eGFRcr were evaluated using a linear mixed effects model. The relationships between obesity indicators and new-onset proteinuria were evaluated using Poisson regression analysis.

Results


Analysis was performed on 2,753 subjects (mean age 50.3 years [standard deviation 10.0], 1,419 men, 1,334 women). The VFA ≥100 cm2 group exhibited a significantly larger difference in the annual change in eGFRcr (-0.24 mL/min/1.73 m2, p=0.03) than the <100 cm2 group. Furthermore, there was a significant difference in the proteinuria incidence ratio, which was 1.54 times higher in the VFA ≥100 cm2 group (95% confidence interval: 1.01 to 2.35). Significant correlations were not observed with any of the other obesity indicators.

Conclusion


VFA ≥100 cm2 was significantly associated with a greater annual decline in eGFRcr and the higher incidence of new-onset proteinuria. VFA is suggested as the most sensitive obesity indicator for the decline in kidney function and new-onset proteinuria.

Funding

  • Government Support - Non-U.S.