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Kidney Week

Abstract: TH-PO595

Profiles and Determinants of Dialysis Recovery Time in Incident Hemodialysis

Session Information

Category: Health Maintenance, Nutrition, and Metabolism

  • 1300 Health Maintenance, Nutrition, and Metabolism

Authors

  • Jiao, Yue, Fresenius Medical Care North America, Waltham, Massachusetts, United States
  • Rigodon, Vladimir, Frenova Renal Research, Waltham, Massachusetts, United States
  • Guedes, Murilo Henrique, Pontificia Universidade Catolica do Parana, Curitiba, Brazil
  • Pecoits-Filho, Roberto, Pontificia Universidade Catolica do Parana, Curitiba, Brazil
  • Leme, Juliana El ghoz, Pontificia Universidade Catolica do Parana, Curitiba, Brazil
  • Raimann, Jochen G., Renal Research Institute, New York, New York, United States
  • Kotanko, Peter, Renal Research Institute, New York, New York, United States
  • Moraes, Thyago Proença de, Pontificia Universidade Catolica do Parana, Curitiba, Brazil
  • Thadhani, Ravi I., Cedars-Sinai, Los Angeles, California, United States
  • Maddux, Franklin W., Fresenius Medical Care, Waltham, Massachusetts, United States
  • Usvyat, Len A., Fresenius Medical Care North America, Waltham, Massachusetts, United States
  • Larkin, John W., Fresenius Medical Care North America, Waltham, United States
Background

Hemodialysis (HD) is lifesaving, yet can associate with symptoms (e.g. nausea, cramping and fatigue). Dialysis recovery time (DRT) surveys capture the perceived time after HD to return to performing regular activities. We characterized the profiles and determinants of DRT in incident HD treated at a large dialysis organization (LDO) in the United States.

Methods

We used data at an LDO during 2014 through 2017 for patients who completed a DRT survey ≤180 from first date of HD. DRT survey was administered as part of KDQOL questionnaire. DRT survey asks: “How long does it take you to be able to return to your normal activities after your dialysis treatment?”. Categorical answers were: <0.5, 0.5-1, 1-2, 2-4, >4 hours. Distinctions in demographic and clinical variables were assessed between DRT categories, with <0.5 hours as a reference.

Results

We analyzed data from 98616 HD patients who completed the DRT survey in the first 180 days of HD. Patients were 62.6±14.4 years old, 57.8% male, 69.1% white race, 64.7% used a catheter. Incident HD patients typically had a DRT <1 (19.1%) or >4 hours (22.9%). All demographic and clinical variables had some association with longer DRT categories compared to a DRT <0.5 hour, with exception of HD treatment time, interdialytic weight gain, and phosphate levels. Select variables are noted in Table 1.

Conclusion

More than 20% of incident HD patients report a DRT >4 hours. Longer DRTs are associate with most demographic and clinical variables. Remarkable factors associated with longer DRTs include: catheter use; lower albumin, sodium and iPTH levels; lower Kt/V, ultrafiltration volume by body weight, ultrafiltration rates, and treatment frequency. Patient centered strategies to optimize the HD therapy need to be tested and may have potential to improve how patients feel from HD and enhance their quality of life.

Funding

  • Commercial Support