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Kidney Week

Abstract: TH-OR091

The Effect of a Combined Resistance and Cardiovascular Exercise Program on Peritoneal Dialysis Patients: A Pilot Randomized Control Trial

Session Information

  • Home Dialysis
    November 07, 2019 | Location: 143, Walter E. Washington Convention Center
    Abstract Time: 05:06 PM - 05:18 PM

Category: Dialysis

  • 703 Dialysis: Peritoneal Dialysis

Authors

  • Bennett, Paul N., Satellite Healthcare, San Jose, California, United States
  • West, Michael G., Satellite Healthcare/Wellbound, Sacramento, California, United States
  • Hussein, Wael F., Satellite Healthcare, San Jose, California, United States
  • Smith, Erick, Satellite Healthcare, San Jose, California, United States
  • Reiterman, Marc, Satellite Healthcare, San Jose, California, United States
  • Patel, Jignesh, Satellite Healthcare/Wellbound, Sacramento, California, United States
  • Alagadan, Grace M., Satellite Healthcare/Wellbound, Sacramento, California, United States
  • Carrasco, Anna Rosa, Satellite Healthcare, San Jose, California, United States
  • Schiller, Brigitte, Satellite Healthcare, San Jose, California, United States
Background

Patients receiving peritoneal dialysis (PD) are physically inactive, resulting in poor physical function. The aims of this study were to test the feasibility, and measure the effect of a combined resistance and cardiovascular exercise program on physical function and patient reported outcome measures (PROMs).

Methods

Pilot randomized controlled trial (RCT). Intervention (I) group received monthly exercise physiologist consultations, exercise prescription (resistance and aerobic exercise program using exercise bands) and four phone calls over 12 weeks. Control (C) group received normal care. Feasibility outcomes were exercise adherence rates and adverse events. Physical function effect was measured by change in I compared to the C group in 30 second sit to stand test (STS), pinch strength test (PST) and the 8 foot timed up and go test (8TUG). PROMs were measured using the London Evaluation of Illness (LEVIL) instrument.

Results

From a single center with 75 PD patients, 18 (24%) did not meet inclusion criteria (7 unable to understand English, 4 PD<6 weeks, 3 significant amputations, 2 medically unstable, 2 unable to independently ambulate). 21 (28%) patients declined to participate resulting in a recruitment rate of 48% consisting of 36 patients randomized into 2 groups of 18 (1:1). 10 patients did not complete the study resulting in a retention rate of 72% and analyzable data for 26 patients (13 in each arm). 10 out of 13 (77%) intervention patients completed greater than 50% of sessions. No serious adverse events caused by the exercise program were reported. In all physical function measures the intervention exercise group improved more than the control group without reaching statistical significance. PROMs improved in the exercise group and worsened in the control group in the domains of wellbeing, fatigue, shortness of breath and appetite; sleep improved more in the exercise group; and pain worsened more in the control group.

Conclusion

This study is the largest reported US RCT demonstrating a resistance and cardiovascular exercise program is feasible and safe and can increase physical activity and physical function in PD patients. A future PDEx study using a larger sample size, is feasible in the US peritoneal dialysis context.