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Abstract: TH-PO1162

A Cultural Competence Assessment of the Living Donor Navigator Program Reveals Sex Differences

Session Information

Category: Transplantation

  • 1902 Transplantation: Clinical

Authors

  • Reed, Rhiannon D., University of Alabama at Birmingham, Birmingham, Alabama, United States
  • Berry, Beverly M., University of Alabama at Birmingham, Birmingham, Alabama, United States
  • Mustian, Margaux N., University of Alabama at Birmingham, Birmingham, Alabama, United States
  • Maclennan, Paul A., University of Alabama at Birmingham, Birmingham, Alabama, United States
  • Shelton, Brittany A., University of Alabama at Birmingham, Birmingham, Alabama, United States
  • Carter, Alexis J., University of Alabama at Birmingham, Birmingham, Alabama, United States
  • Grant, Raynesha, University of Alabama at Birmingham, Birmingham, Alabama, United States
  • Locke, Jayme E., University of Alabama at Birmingham, Birmingham, Alabama, United States
Background

The Living Donor Navigator (LDN) Program aims to separate the patient's burden of asking for a kidney transplant and improve potential living donor comfort with the evaluation process and has been particularly successful among African Americans. Care that is sensitive to the cultural needs of patients can result in improved health outcomes, especially among a high minority patient population. We sought to assess the cultural competence of the LDN program.

Methods

A modified Iowa Cultural Understanding Assessment was mailed to advocates from the LDN program and potential living donors who were screened on behalf of transplant candidates in the program. Response choices were on a Likert scale from 1 (strongly disagree) to 5 (strongly agree). Proportions who agreed/strongly agreed were compared by sex and race using Fisher’s exact test.

Results

There were 13 responses from 62 surveys (21% response rate). Twelve (92%) respondents were African American, and 61.5% were female. Overall, satisfaction with cultural competence was high, with > 60% of respondents reporting that they agreed/strongly agreed with 24/25 items. When comparing by sex, all female respondents (vs. 40% of males) agreed that the program helped them deal with problems in their day-to-day life (p=0.04) (Table). All female respondents (vs. 60% of males) agreed that the navigators were flexible and provided alternate approaches to meet their cultural needs (p=0.10). When exploring by race, the single Caucasian respondent agreed strongly with all items.

Conclusion

Though limited by small sample size, these preliminary data suggest that the LDN program reflects cultural sensitivity and meets the needs of participants socially, culturally, and linguistically. However, further qualitative exploration to understand sex differences is warranted.

Funding

  • Private Foundation Support