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Abstract: FR-PO841

Prevalence of Periodontal Disease Bacteria in Tonsils of IgA Nephropathy Patients

Session Information

Category: Glomerular Diseases

  • 1202 Glomerular Diseases: Immunology and Inflammation

Authors

  • Nagasawa, Yasuyuki, Hyogo College of Medicine, Nishinomiya, Japan
  • Nomura, Ryota, Osaka University Graduate School of Dentistry, Suita, Japan
  • Misaki, Taro, Seirei Hamamatsu General Hospital, Hamamatsu, Shizuoka, Japan
  • Ito, Seigo, National defense medical college, Tokorozawa, Japan
  • Naka, Shuhei, Okayama University Graduate School of Medicine, Dentistry and Pharmaceutical Sciences, Okayama, Japan
  • Wato, Kaoruko, Osaka University Graduate School of Dentistry, Suita, Japan
  • Hasuike, Yukiko, Hyogo College of Medicine, Nishinomiya, Japan
  • Kuragano, Takahiro, Internal Medicine Division of Kidney and Dialysis, Nishinomiya, Japan
  • Ishihara, Masaharu, Hyogo College of Medicine, Nishinomiya, Japan
  • Matsumoto-Nakano, Michiyo, Okayama University Graduate School of Medicine, Dentistry and Pharmaceutical Sciences, Okayama, Japan
  • Nakano, Kazuhiko, Osaka University Graduate School of Dentistry, Suita, Japan
Background

IgA nephropathy (IgAN) is one of most common primary glomerulonephritis, whose pathogenesis had remained unclear. We had reported that C.rectus and T.denticola, kinds of major periodontal disease bacteria, in tonsils with IgA nephropathy patients were specific to IgAN patients compared with chronic tonsillitis (Nagasawa-Y et al, Plos One, 2014). We also reported C.rectus and S.mutans increased proteinuria synergistically (Misaki-T et al, Nephron, 2018). P.gingivalis had not been evaluated in IgAN patients, although P.gingivalis is well known as one of most common periodontal disease bacteria. In this study, we evaluated the periodontal disease bacteria including P.gingivalis in tonsils of IgAN patients, and the relationship between these periodontal bacteria clinical features in IgAN patietns.

Methods

Tonsils were obtained from 23 IgAN patients and 63 chronic tonsillitis patients when the tonsillectomy was operated. mRNAs were extracted from tonsils and the prevalences of C.rectus and T.denticola, and P.gingivalis were evaluated by RT-PCR using bacteria specific primers. All patients gave the written informed consent which was approved by Hyogo College of medicine.

Results

Average age was 33+-14 in IgAN patients, and the age in control patients was 27+-7. The average proteinuria in IgAN patietns was 0.9+-1.1g/gcre, and average hematuria was (2+). The prevalence of C.rectus in IgA patients was 76%, while the prevalence in control patients was 62%. The prevalence of T.denticola was very low in both groups (0%, 1.6%). The prevalence of P.gingivalis in IgA patients was significantly higher than that in control patients (33% vs 3.2%, respectively, P=0.0001), which had not been reported. IgAN patients with C.rectus had greater proteinuria than those without C.rectus (1.2+-0.4 vs 0.5 +-0.3, respectively). IgAN patients with or without P.gingivalis had same levels of proteinuria (1.1+-0.4 vs 1.1 +-0.3, respectively). The types of cilia of P.gingivalis (fim A types) were also evaluated. Obviously untypeable of fim A, which is usually minor type, was dominant in IgAN patients.

Conclusion

Periodontal disease bacteria including P.gingivalis in tonsils were related with IgAN. The type of cilia of P.gingivalis might have some relationship with pathogenesis of IgAN