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Kidney Week

Abstract: TH-PO393

High-Normal Albuminuria Is Strongly Associated with Incident CKD in a Nondiabetic Population with Normal Kidney Function

Session Information

Category: CKD (Non-Dialysis)

  • 2101 CKD (Non-Dialysis): Epidemiology, Risk Factors, and Prevention

Authors

  • Okubo, Aiko, Ichiyokai Harada Hospital, Hiroshima, Japan
  • Nakashima, Ayumu, Hiroshima University Hospital, Hiroshima, Japan
  • Doi, Shigehiro, Hiroshima University Hospital, Hiroshima, Japan
  • Doi, Toshiki, Hiroshima University Hospital, Hiroshima, Japan
  • Ueno, Toshinori, Hiroshima University Hospital, Hiroshima, Japan
  • Maeda, Kazuya, Hiroshima University Hospital, Hiroshima, Japan
  • Masaki, Takao, Hiroshima University Hospital, Hiroshima, Japan
Background

Several studies have reported that high albuminuria within the normal range (high–normal albuminuria) is associated with chronic kidney disease (CKD). This study aimed to clarify the association between high–normal albuminuria and the risk of incident CKD, particularly in a nondiabetic population with normal kidney function.

Methods

A 10–year follow–up, retrospective cohort study was preformed involving 317 Japanese men (mean age, 42 years) with an eGFR ≥ 90 mL/min/1.73 m2 and urine albumin-to-creatinine ratio (UACR) < 30 mg/gCr. Patients were free of diabetes mellitus. We calculated the cut–off value of the UACR from receiver–operating characteristic curves, and the value of ≥ 7.0 mg/gCr was defined as high–normal albuminuria. Multivariate stepwise analysis and logistic regression approaches were used to assess independent predictors of the incidence of CKD.

Results

Twenty–nine (9%) participants developed CKD through 10 years of follow–up. At the baseline examination, blood pressure, the UACR, and BUN values were higher in participants who developed incident CKD than in those with normal renal function. After adjustment for confounders, high–normal albuminuria was associated with an increased risk of incident CKD. Logistic regression analyses showed that subjects with a UACR ≥ 7.0 mg/gCr had an increased risk of new–onset CKD 10–years later compared with a UACR < 7.0 mg/gCr (odds ratio, 16.61; 95% confidence interval, 6.45–42.78; P < 0.01]. This difference persisted after adjustment for age, BMI, hypertension, smoking status, and dyslipidemia.

Conclusion

High–normal albuminuria is associated with incident CKD in a nondiabetic population with normal kidney function.