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Kidney Week

Abstract: TH-PO726

Women on Dialysis and Health-Related Quality-of-Life Measures

Session Information

Category: Women’s Health and Kidney Diseases

  • 2000 Women’s Health and Kidney Diseases

Authors

  • Al-Ali, Fadwa M., Hamad Medical Corporation, Doha, Qatar
  • Fouda, Tarek Ahmed, Hamad Medical Corporation, Doha, Qatar
  • Elshirbeny, Mostafa Fottoh, Hamad Medical Corporation, Doha, Qatar
  • Ibrahim, Rania Abdelaziz, Hamad Medical Corporation, Doha, Qatar
  • Mohamed, Mohamed Yahya Abdelhai, Hamad Medical Corporation, Doha, Qatar
  • Hamad, Abdullah Ibrahim, Hamad Medical Corporation, Doha, Qatar
Background

Dialysis patients have poor health-related quality of life (HRQOL). Gender differences in HRQOL are poorly studied in dialysis patients. We performed a cross sectional study to evaluate HRQOL measures in women on dialysis in the State of Qatar.

Methods

A cross-sectional study in dialysis patients. Demographic and clinical characteristics data were obtained from electronic medical records. We performed 3 questionnaires to assess HRQOL measures.1- The Center for Epidemiologic Studies Depression Scale (CESD-R) with depression diagnosed with score >18, 2- Brief Pain Inventory (BPI) to evaluate the severity of patients’ pain (0-3 scale) and its impact on daily function. 3- The Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index (PSQI) (poor sleep with PSQI >5).

Results

We studied 253 dialysis patients (female 137, 96 on peritoneal dialysis (PD), age 56+/-14, BMI 29+/-7). Most patients reported mild or no chronic pain (75.6%). More women had moderate to severe chronic pain than men (30% vs.16% p 0.01). 76.5% of diaysis patients reported poor sleep (81% of women vs. 70% of men p=0.069) and 39% had depression (52% women vs. 25% men p<0.001). We identified 3 factors associated with both depression and poor sleep. First, diabetic women on dialysis had more depression and poor sleep than non-diabetics (59% vs. 40% p0.03 and 92% vs. 79% p 0.02 respectively). Second, Women on hemodialysis (HD) had more depression and poor sleep than PD (54% vs. 46% p>0.05 and 88% vs. 65% p 0.001 respectively). Third, Older women >60 years had more depression (59% vs.42% p0.05) and poor sleep (92% vs. 76% p0.0008) vs. younger women.
There was a strong correlation of PSQI score and CES-D score in women only (R=0.67 p <0.0001). There was no correlation between our studied HRQOL measures in women and calcium, phosphorus, PTH, Kt/V, LDL or vitamin D levels.

Conclusion

We found that women on dialysis had higher prevalence of depression, poor sleep and moderate to severe chronic pain than men. DM, HD and old age were associated with a higher rate of depression and poor sleep. Understanding gender differences in dialysis patient can help guide treatment for high risk groups.