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Abstract: FR-PO522

Evaluation of a Wearable Artificial Kidney for Peritoneal Dialysis in a Uremic Pig Model

Session Information

Category: Dialysis

  • 703 Dialysis: Peritoneal Dialysis

Authors

  • van Gelder, Maaike K., University Medical Center Utrecht, Utrecht, Utrecht, Netherlands
  • Simonis, Frank, Nanodialysis, Oirschot, Netherlands
  • Monninkhof, Anneke Suzanne, University Medical Center Utrecht, Utrecht, Utrecht, Netherlands
  • Hazenbrink, Diënty, University Medical Center Utrecht, Utrecht, Utrecht, Netherlands
  • Bajo, Maria A., Hospital University La Paz, Madrid, Spain
  • Selgas, Rafael, Hospital University La Paz, Madrid, Spain
  • Bianchini, Elena, University of Modena and Reggio Emilia, Modena, Italy
  • Giovanella, Silvia, University of Modena and Reggio Emilia, Modena, Italy
  • Ligabue, Giulia, University of Modena and Reggio Emilia, Modena, Italy
  • Cappelli, Gianni, University of Modena and Reggio Emilia, Modena, Italy
  • Gerritsen, Karin G., University Medical Center Utrecht, Utrecht, Utrecht, Netherlands
Background

A WEarable Artificial KIDney (WEAKID – H2020 SC1) for peritoneal dialysis (PD) was designed that recirculates dialysate via a tidal mode using a single lumen peritoneal catheter. We hypothesize that continuous dialysate regeneration by the WEAKID system containing sorbents, will maintain a high plasma-dialysate concentration gradient and increase the mass transfer area coefficient (MTAC). Thereby, WEAKID may enhance clearance while reducing the number of exchanges. Application is envisaged at night as a bedside device (12 kg, nighttime system). A wearable system (1.6 kg, daytime system) may further enhance clearance during the day.

Methods

The day- (n=3) and nighttime system (n=8) were tested separately for 8 h/treatment in a uremic pig model for PD (n=2). Plasma clearance and the MTAC of urea, creatinine and phosphate with the day- and nighttime system were compared with a standard peritoneal membrane permeability analysis (SPA, n=13).

Results

The daytime system caused a 2.0-fold (p=0.01) and 1.6-fold (p=0.07) increase in creatinine and phosphate clearance and 1.9-fold (p=0.01) and 1.6-fold (p=0.04) increase in MTAC creatinine and phosphate, resp., vs a SPA (Table 1). With the nighttime system, creatinine clearance and MTAC increased by a factor of 1.2 (p=0.002) and 1.4 (p=0.01), resp.

Conclusion

WEAKID increases small solute clearance compared with a SPA. This provides a rationale for a first in human clinical trial to evaluate safety and efficacy of WEAKID in PD patients.

Funding

  • Government Support - Non-U.S.