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Abstract: SA-PO821

Effect of Cranberry Extract (Vaccinium macrocarpon) on Inflammation, Oxidative Stress, and Uremic Toxins in CKD Patients

Session Information

Category: Health Maintenance, Nutrition, and Metabolism

  • 1300 Health Maintenance, Nutrition, and Metabolism

Authors

  • Mafra, Denise, Federal Fluminense University, Niterói, RIO DE JANEIRO, Brazil
  • Moreira, Laís Gouveia, Federal Fluminense University, Niterói, RIO DE JANEIRO, Brazil
  • Borges, Natalia Alvarenga, Federal Fluminense University, Niterói, RIO DE JANEIRO, Brazil
  • Cardozo, Ludmila Fmf, Federal Fluminense University, Niterói, RIO DE JANEIRO, Brazil
  • Brito, Jessyca Sousa de, Federal Fluminense University, Niterói, RIO DE JANEIRO, Brazil
  • Paiva, Bruna, Federal Fluminense University, Niterói, RIO DE JANEIRO, Brazil
  • Leal, Viviane Oliveira, Federal Fluminense University, Niterói, RIO DE JANEIRO, Brazil
  • Teixeira, Karla thais Resende, Federal Fluminense University, Niterói, RIO DE JANEIRO, Brazil
  • Carraro-Eduardo, José Carlos, Federal Fluminense University, Niterói, RIO DE JANEIRO, Brazil

Group or Team Name

  • Nutrição em Nefrologia
Background

Chronic kidney disease (CKD) patients present many complications that potentially could be linked to increased cardiovascular risk such as inflammation, oxidative stress and high levels of uremic toxins from gut microbiota. Bioactive compounds from food may reduce these complications, such as polyphenols present in fruits like cranberry, which have antioxidant, anti-inflammatory and prebiotics properties.

Methods

In this randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled study, 30 non-dialysis CKD patients were randomized to receive cranberry dry extract (1000 mg/day containing 72mg of proanthocyanidins) or placebo (1000mg/day of corn starch) for 2 months. Blood samples were collected at baseline and after intervention. The mRNA expression of factor erythroid 2-related factor 2 (Nrf2) and nuclear factor-kappa B (NF- κB) was evaluated by real-time PCR. Uremic toxins plasma levels [indoxyl sulfate (IS), p-cresyl sulfate (PCS), and indole-3-acetic acid (IAA)] were obtained by Reversed-Phase HPLC and, the analysis of thiobarbituric acid reactive substances (TBARS) were also performed.

Results

Twenty-seven patients concluded the study: 13 patients in the cranberry group (55.7 ± 7.5 years, 5 males) and 14 in the placebo group (57.7 ± 5.7 years, 4 men). Treatment adherence was above 96% in both groups. There was no significant difference in NF-κB or Nrf2 mRNA expression after cranberry supplementation [0.91 (0.62 – 1.19) to 1.20 (0.75 – 1.80), p=0.21 and 1.31 (0.59 – 2.95) to 0.99 (0.61 – 1.25), p=0.57), respectively]. TBARS levels did not change after cranberry supplementation. The uremic toxins plasma levels also did not change [IS: 2.97 (1,28 – 4.42) mg/L to 2.86 (1.32 – 4.14) mg/dL, p=0.53; PCS: 14.94 mg/L (7.12 – 23.53) to 17.63 (5.74 – 23.50)mg/L, p=0.48; IAA: 758.99 (608.5 – 1237.4) µg/L to 664.5 (500.5 – 1592.3) µg/L, p=0.58). There were no significant differences in the placebo group.

Conclusion

Short-term cranberry dry extract supplementation does not appear to influence inflammation, oxidative stress and uremic toxins in non-dialysis CKD patients. Long-term studies with different doses are needed to determine whether cranberry dry extract may affect these markers in CKD patients.

Funding

  • Government Support - Non-U.S.