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Abstract: TH-PO729

Cardiac Mortality in People with ESKD in Australia and New Zealand: A Cohort Study from 1980 to 2013

Session Information

Category: Women’s Health and Kidney Diseases

  • 2000 Women’s Health and Kidney Diseases

Authors

  • O'Lone, Emma Louise, University of Sydney, Sydney, New South Wales, Australia
  • De la mata, Nicole, The University of Sydney, Camperdown, New South Wales, Australia
  • Webster, Angela C., University of Sydney, Sydney, New South Wales, Australia
Background

The presence of cardiac disease is an important predictor of mortality in people with ESKD. Therapies for reducing cardiac risk and treatment of cardiac events may be less effective in people with ESKD compared to the general population. We aim to review the standardised mortality ratios from cardiovascular disease (CVD) for people with ESKD in the Australian and New Zealand general population.

Methods

Cohort study of incident people with ESKD in Australia and New Zealand, 1980-2013. ANZDATA was linked with death registries to obtain cause of death. Summary data for cause specific death in the general population were obtained. We calculated mortality rates for CVD as defined by ICD10 codes and standardised mortality ratios (SMRs with 95% confidence intervals [CI]), compared with the general population, using indirect standardisation, by age, sex and calendar year.

Results

There were 60,823 participants contributing 381,874 years of observation time. In total there were 6847 cardiac deaths of which 5947 (86.9%) were ischaemic heart disease deaths. The rate of cardiac mortality compared to the general population was higher in women (women: SMR 8.3 95%CI 8.0-8.6, men: SMR 5.695%CI 5.5-5.8). Young women were particularly affected having over double the increased rate of cardiac mortality relative to the general population (ages 30-49: women: SMR 59.7 95%CI 51.8-69.0, men 17.7 95%CI 15.9-19.7). Relative cardiac mortality rates have improved over time for women but have been stable in men (Figure 1).

Conclusion

The mortality rates in the Australian and New Zealand ESKD population are higher than the general population. Young women with ESKD have an excessive relative risk of dying from cardiac disease, compared to young females in the general population. The relative risk of women dying from cardiac disease has reduced over time.

FIgure 1. Standardised mortality ratios for cardiac death over time

Funding

  • Government Support - Non-U.S.