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Kidney Week

Abstract: SA-OR111

Serum Transforming Growth Factor β1 Is a Sex-Specific Risk Factor for Accelerated GFR Decline in the General Population

Session Information

Category: Women’s Health and Kidney Diseases

  • 2000 Women’s Health and Kidney Diseases

Authors

  • Norvik, Jon V., University Hospital of North Norway, Tromsø, Norway
  • Enoksen, Inger Therese Tonsberg, UiT - The Arctic University of Norway, Tromsø, TROMS, Norway
  • Ju, Wenjun, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan, United States
  • Solbu, Marit D., University Hospital of North Norway, Tromsø, Norway
  • Nair, Viji, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan, United States
  • Kretzler, Matthias, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan, United States
  • Eriksen, Bjorn Odvar, University Hospital of North Norway, Tromsø, Norway
  • Melsom, Toralf, University Hospital of North Norway, Tromsø, Norway
Background

The health burden of chronic kidney disease (CKD) is increasing worldwide, and there is a need for novel biomarkers that can identify those at CKD risk for early preventive measures. There are sex differences in the progression of CKD and several risk factors seem to affect CKD risk differently in men and women. We investigated the association between serum transforming growth factor β1 (TGF-β1), a key mediator in kidney fibrosis development, and risk of accelerated loss of glomerular filtration rate (GFR) in women and men from the general population.

Methods

In the Renal Iohexol Clearance Survey in Tromsø 6 (RENIS-T6), we measured GFR by iohexol-clearance in 826 women and 801 men between 50 and 62 years of age without self-reported diabetes, cardiovascular or kidney disease. Of these, 1,324 (81%) had a follow-up GFR measurement after a median of 5.6 years in the RENIS-Follow Up. We used a multiple logistic regression model to examine the association between serum TGF-β1 and accelerated GFR decline (defined as subjects with the 10% steepest GFR slope).

Results

After adjusting for CKD risk factors, 1 SD increase in TGF-β1 levels was associated with higher odds of accelerated GFR decline in women (odds ratio (OR) 1.38 (95% confidence interval (CI) 1.01 to 1.89)), but not in men (p for interaction 0.03). Women with TGF-β1 in the upper quartile had an OR of 2.74 (95% CI 1.05 to 7.17) compared to women with TGF-b1 in the lower quartile.

Conclusion

Higher baseline TGF-β1 was independently associated with accelerated GFR decline in women, but not in men.

Funding

  • Government Support - Non-U.S.