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Kidney Week

Abstract: TH-PO1163

Knowledge and Receipt of Information About Living Donor Kidney Transplant Among Individuals with Advanced CKD

Session Information

Category: Transplantation

  • 1902 Transplantation: Clinical

Authors

  • Mohottige, Dinushika, Duke University School of Medicine, Durham, North Carolina, United States
  • Ephraim, Patti, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, Maryland, United States
  • Lee, Hui-Jie, Duke University, Durham, North Carolina, United States
  • Davenport, Clemontina A., Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina, United States
  • Pendergast, Jane F., Duke University, Durham, North Carolina, United States
  • DePasquale, Nicole, Duke University School of Medicine, Durham, North Carolina, United States
  • Diamantidis, Clarissa Jonas, Duke University School of Medicine, Durham, North Carolina, United States
  • Boulware, L. Ebony, Duke University School of Medicine, Durham, North Carolina, United States
Background

Knowledge about live donor kidney transplant (LDKT) is modifiable and is associated with access to LDKT. Yet, little is known about factors associated with LDKT knowledge or receipt of information about LDKT.

Methods

We conducted a cross-sectional study among nephrology clinic patients who were eligible for pre-emptive LDKT and enrolled in a trial on interventions to improve access to LDKT. We assessed participants’ LDKT knowledge [10 pt. scale based on correct answers to questions about prognosis, donation, and financial aspects of LDKT; (high knowledge >8)], self-reported receipt of LDKT information from health professionals, and self-reported information sharing with family/friends. Using logistic regression (adjusting for participants age, race, and income), we quantified the association of LDKT knowledge with participants’ receipt of LDKT information and their sharing of LDKT information with family/friends.

Results

The 130 participants had mean (SD) age 58.3 (9) years, 60% were female, 47.7% were African American, and 49% had a high school education or less. Participants’ had a mean (SD) GFR of 26.6 (9.1) ml/min/1.73m2 and they had seen their nephrologists for 3.4 (4) years. Over half (55.4%) had high LDKT knowledge, and 33.1% reported having received LDKT information. Few (28.5%) had shared LDKT information with family/friends. Participants who reported receipt (vs. not) of LDKT information were more likely to have high knowledge (45.8% vs. 17.2%, p=0.001). Those who shared (vs. did not) information about LDKT with a family/friend were also more likely to have high LDKT knowledge (38.9% vs. 15.5%, p=0.006), as were those who received (vs. did not) LDKT info from health professionals (24.6% vs. 10.3%, p=0.001). After adjustment, those who received (vs. did not) LDKT information from health professionals had 4-fold higher odds of high LDKT knowledge (adjusted OR [95% CI]: 4.01: [1.49, 12.18], while those who shared information with family/friends had 3-fold higher odds of high LDKT knowledge (3.05 [1.24, 8.08]).

Conclusion

Improved provision of LDKT information to patients with advanced CKD and involvement of family members or friends could aid efforts to improve LDKT rates.

Funding

  • NIDDK Support