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Kidney Week

Abstract: FR-PO323

Online Peer Mentoring Is Associated with Improved Burden Score Among Caregivers of Patients with CKD

Session Information

Category: CKD (Non-Dialysis)

  • 2102 CKD (Non-Dialysis): Clinical, Outcomes, and Trials

Authors

  • Ezeji, George Chinedu, Penn State College of Medicine, Hershey, Pennsylvania, United States
  • Lopez, Eric Mark J., Penn State College of Medicine, Hershey, Pennsylvania, United States
  • Romeu, Jose C., Penn State College of Medicine, Hershey, Pennsylvania, United States
  • Bartolomeo, Korey, Penn State College of Medicine, Hershey, Pennsylvania, United States
  • Chinchilli, Vernon M., Penn State College of Medicine, Hershey, Pennsylvania, United States
  • Ghahramani, Nasrollah, Penn State College of Medicine, Hershey, Pennsylvania, United States
Background

Caregivers experience significant burden resulting from providing care to patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD). Peer mentoring (PM) has been proposed as an effective strategy which may result in improvement in caregiver burden. This study evaluates the differences in the effect of online PM, face-to-face (FTF) PM, and usual care on burden among caregivers of patients with CKD.

Methods

A 16-hour structured program trained CKD patients and their caregivers to become peer mentors to newly diagnosed patients with CKD and their caregivers. Caregivers of patients with stage 4 or stage 5 CKD (n=86) were randomly assigned to online PM (n=29), FTF PM (n=29) or usual care (n=28). Online PM consisted of weekly communication through an interactive online platform, and more frequently through posts by the mentee. For the FTF group, the frequency of contact by a mentor was weekly by phone and monthly visit. PM was maintained for at least 6 months. Usual care participants received an information book about care of CKD patients. We used the 22-item Zarit Burden Interview (ZBI) to measure caregiver burden at baseline and months 12 and 18. Higher ZBI scores indicate heavier burden. We used linear mixed effect models to estimate the slope of change of ZBI score over time. SAS, version 9.4 was used for data analysis.

Results

A total of 70 caregivers completed the 18 month assessment. Baseline ZBI score and demographic characteristics (race, ethnicity, gender, age, marital status, education, employment status and rural/urban location) were similar among the groups. The online PM group showed a significant improvement in the mean ZBI score between baseline and 12 months (23.6±12.1 vs. 16.5±9.1); this improvement was sustained at 18 months (15.2±9.9) (Slope estimate [SE]:-3.44; 95% confidence interval [CI]:-6.31, -0.57 [P=0.02]). The decrease in ZBI was not significant in the FTF group (SE:-2.50;CI: -5.85, 0.87 [P=0.14]), or the control group (SE: -1.26;CI: -4.06, 1.54 [P=0.36]). Improved ZBI with online PM was independent of demographic characteristics.

Conclusion

Online PM is associated with a significant improvement in burden score among caregivers of patients with advanced CKD. The improvement is sustained at 18 months and is independent of demographic characteristics.
Funding by: PCORI

Funding

  • Other U.S. Government Support