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Abstract: SA-PO354

High PTH Levels Inhibit Biorhythm of Human Vascular Smooth Muscle Cells In Vitro

Session Information

Category: Hypertension and CVD

  • 1403 Hypertension and CVD: Mechanisms

Authors

  • Wang, Ningning, Department of Nephrology,The First Affiliated Hospital with Nanjing Medical University, Nanjing, China
  • Cui, Ying, Department of Nephrology,The First Affiliated Hospital with Nanjing Medical University, Nanjing, China
  • Wang, Qingting, Department of Nephrology,The First Affiliated Hospital with Nanjing Medical University, Nanjing, China
Background

In normal condition, vascular smooth muscle cells have self circadian rhythm. Here we observed the influences of high levels of parathyroid hormone (PTH) on circadian genes in human aortic vascular smooth muscle cells (hASMCs) in vitro.

Methods

Human ASMCs were divided into control and (1-84)PTH(10nmol/L) group. The timing of the beginning stimulated was counted as zeitgeber time 0 (ZT0). Thereafter, cells were collected every 4 hours for a total of 28 hours. The mRNA expressions of PPARγ, Bmal1, Per2 and Rev-erbα in different groups of cells at different time points were detected by quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR).

Results

mRNA expressions of PPARγ and clock genes Bmal1, Per2 and Rev-erbα showed circadian rhythms in the control group, and peaked at ZT4, ZT12, ZT4 and ZT20 respectively. High levels of PTH could inhibit the expression amplitudes of above genes, without affecting time phases of expressions.

Conclusion


High PTH levels could inhibit biorhythm of HASMCs, its relationships with vascular circadian rhythm abnormalities need further study.

Funding

  • Government Support - Non-U.S.