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Abstract: SA-PO799

Dietary Results from the CKD Observational Database (CKDOD) in China

Session Information

Category: Health Maintenance, Nutrition, and Metabolism

  • 1300 Health Maintenance, Nutrition, and Metabolism

Authors

  • Hu, Zhao, Qilu Hospital of Shandong University, Shandong, China
  • Dong, Junwu, Wuhan puai hospital, Wuhan, China
  • Zhang, Hao, The Third Xiangya Hospital of Central South University, Changsha, Hunan, China
  • Li, Detian, China Medical University, Shenyang, China
  • Hong, Fuyuan, Fujian Provincial Hospital, Fuzhou, China
  • Wang, Yuxin, Xiamen Medical College, Xiamen, China
  • Liu, Junlan, The First Affiliated Hospital of Xiamen University, Xiamen, China
  • Zhang, Yanlin, The First Affiliated Hospital of Xiamen University, Xiamen, China
  • Li, Xinjian, Jining Medical University, Jining, China
  • Yu, Miao, Fresenius Kabi Pharmaceutical Co.,Ltd, Beijing, China
  • Koch, Peter Christian, Fresenius Kabi Deutschland GmbH, Bad Homburg, Germany
  • Kulkarni, Hrishikesh G., Fresenius Kabi Deutschland GmbH, Bad Homburg, Germany
  • Wang, Jianmei, Fresenius Kabi Pharmaceutical Co.,Ltd, Beijing, China
  • Schweda, Aike Torben, DBM Wissen schafft, Wiesloch, Germany
  • Ikizler, Talat Alp, Vanderbilt University Medical Center, Nashville, Tennessee, United States
Background

Protein restricted diets (PRD) with or without ketoanalogue (KA) supplementation are an established dietary treatment option in chronic kidney disease (CKD). The aim of this study was the evaluation of specific types of protein restriction for management of CKD in China and assessment of associations between different nutritional protein interventions and estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) changes over time.

Methods

733 non-dialysis CKD patients were observed for median 1.1 year in this registry from routine care in China. Demographics and dietary prescriptions were analyzed descriptively. A mixed-effects model adjusting for demographics, CKD stage, and primary cause of CKD was used for longitudinal analysis of eGFR changes.

Results

Time since diagnosis of CKD was 1.1 [0.1; 3.1] years. 15% of patients were in stage 1-2, 35% stage 3, 20% stage 4, and 24% stage 5. PRD were mainly used in stages 3 and 4 (Figure 1A), with 90% of these patients receiving an advice for target of protein intake of 0.6-0.8 g/kg/d (LPD). Higher protein recommendations (0.8-1.0 g/kg/d, intermediate protein diet (IPD)) were more common in earlier CKD stages, e.g., in stage 2, 58% received recommendation for PRD with 25% of these for IPD. KA were prescribed more frequently with lower dietary protein intake (72% LPD, 38% IPD, p<0.001). Mixed effects regression suggested that lower protein intake is associated with slower eGFR decline compared to IPD or normal protein intake (Figure 1 B).

Conclusion

In this select Chinese population cohort, the use of protein restricted diets with or without KA supplementation in advanced stages of chronic kidney disease might be associated with a trend towards slower eGFR decline.

Funding

  • Commercial Support