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Abstract: TH-PO747

Preeclamptic Women Have Decreased Circulating IL-10 Levels at the Time of Active Disease: Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis

Session Information

Category: Women’s Health and Kidney Diseases

  • 2000 Women’s Health and Kidney Diseases

Authors

  • Nath, Meryl C., Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minnesota, United States
  • Cubro, Hajrunisa, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minnesota, United States
  • Weissgerber, Tracey L., Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minnesota, United States
  • Milic, Natasa, Medical Faculty University of Belgrade, Belgrade, Serbia
  • Garovic, Vesna D., Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minnesota, United States
Background

Preeclampsia (PE) is a pregnancy specific disorder characterized by hypertension and proteinuria after 20 weeks of gestation. One hallmark of PE is an abnormal maternal immune response. As a key immunomodulatory cytokine, Interleukin-10 (IL-10) has been shown to be dysregulated in PE. However, studies have reported inconsistent findings about circulating IL-10 levels in PE and normotensive (NT) patients. The aim of the present systematic review and meta-analysis is to assess circulating IL-10 levels in PE and NT patients at two time points: before PE diagnosis and at the time of active disease.

Methods

PubMED, EMBASE, and Web of Science databases were searched to include all published studies examining circulating IL-10 levels in PE and NT patients. Differences in circulating IL-10 levels between PE and NT women were evaluated by standardized mean differences.

Results

Out of the 876 abstracts screened, 56 studies were included in the meta-analysis. At the time of active disease, women with PE (n = 1496) had significantly lower circulating IL-10 levels compared to NT women (n =1897) (SMD: -0.68, 95% CI: -1.08, -0.28; P = 0.0008). Circulating IL-10 levels were lower in both early/severe and late/mild forms of PE. Subgroup analysis revealed that the methodology used to measure circulating IL-10 levels (ELISA or multiplex bead array) and the sample type (plasma or sera) significantly influences the observed differences in circulating IL-10 levels between PE and NT women. Circulating IL-10 levels were not different before the time of active disease (SMD: −0.01, 95% confidence interval [CI]: −0.11, 0.08; P = 0.76).

Conclusion

These findings provide further evidence about the significance of decreased IL-10 levels in the pathophysiology of PE. Further studies are needed to elucidate the clinical implications of these findings and the treatment potential of IL-10 in PE.

Funding

  • Other NIH Support