ASN's Mission

ASN leads the fight to prevent, treat, and cure kidney diseases throughout the world by educating health professionals and scientists, advancing research and innovation, communicating new knowledge, and advocating for the highest quality care for patients.

learn more

Contact ASN

1401 H St, NW, Ste 900, Washington, DC 20005

email@asn-online.org

202-640-4660

The Latest on Twitter

Kidney Week

Abstract: SA-OR079

Canagliflozin and Renal-Related Adverse Events in Type 2 Diabetes and CKD: Results from CREDENCE

Session Information

Category: Diabetic Kidney Disease

  • 602 Diabetic Kidney Disease: Clinical

Authors

  • L Heerspink, Hiddo Jan, University of Groningen, University Medical Center Groningen, Groningen, Netherlands
  • Zhang, Hong, Renal Division of Peking University First Hospital, Beijing, China
  • Mahaffey, Kenneth W., Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, California, United States
  • Li, Jingwei, The George Institute for Global Health, UNSW Sydney, Sydney, New South Wales, Australia
  • Agarwal, Rajiv, Indiana University School of Medicine and VA Medical Center, Indianapolis, Indiana, United States
  • Brenner, Barry M., Brigham and Women’s Hospital, Harvard Medical School and Baim Institute for Clinical Research, Boston, Massachusetts, United States
  • Capuano, George, Janssen Research & Development, LLC, Raritan, New Jersey, United States
  • Charytan, David M., NYU School of Medicine and NYU Langone Medical Center, New York, New York, United States
  • Craig, Jagriti, Janssen Research & Development, LLC, Raritan, New Jersey, United States
  • de Zeeuw, Dick, University of Groningen, University Medical Center Groningen, Groningen, Netherlands
  • Levin, Adeera, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada
  • Neal, Bruce, The George Institute for Global Health, UNSW Sydney, Sydney, Australia
  • Wheeler, David C., UCL Medical School, London, United Kingdom
  • Yavin, Yshai, Janssen Research & Development, LLC, Raritan, New Jersey, United States
  • Perkovic, Vlado, The George Institute for Global Health, UNSW Sydney, Sydney, New South Wales, Australia
Background

Canagliflozin (CANA), a sodium glucose co-transporter 2 inhibitor, has been shown to reduce the risk of major renal outcomes in patients with type 2 diabetes and chronic kidney disease (CKD) in the CREDENCE trial. The aim of this analysis was to examine the incidence of renal-related adverse events (AEs) during treatment with CANA.

Methods

The CREDENCE trial randomly assigned 4401 participants with type 2 diabetes, CKD, and urinary albumin:creatinine ratio >300-5000mg/g to CANA 100 mg/day or placebo (PBO). Rates of renal-related AEs were analyzed using an on-treatment approach overall and by screening eGFR strata (30-<45, 45-<60, and 60-<90 ml/min/1.73m2).

Results

The incidence rate of renal-related AEs was lower in the CANA versus the PBO group (Table), with consistent results for the majority of specific AEs, including acute kidney injury, azotemia, blood creatinine increased, glomerular filtration rate decreased, nephropathy toxic, renal failure, and renal impairment. The incidence rate for serious renal-related AEs was also lower in the CANA compared to the PBO group (Table). The incidence rates of renal-related AEs were lower with CANA relative to PBO across three eGFR strata (HRs of 0.73, 0.60, and 0.81 for eGFR 30-<45, 45-<60, and 60-<90, respectively; P-interaction=0.31). Renal-related serious AEs were also lower with CANA relative to PBO across the three eGFR strata (Table).

Conclusion

CANA decreased the incidence of serious and non-serious renal-related AEs in patients with type 2 diabetes and CKD. These data highlight the renal safety of CANA in this population.

Funding

  • Commercial Support