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Kidney Week

Abstract: FR-PO1209

One-Year Outcome of Deceased Donor Kidney Transplantation in the Elderly Using High Kidney Donor Profile Index Kidneys

Session Information

Category: Transplantation

  • 1902 Transplantation: Clinical

Authors

  • Wong, Wei Xiang, University of Arizona, Banner Medical University Tucson, Tucson, Arizona, United States
  • Low, Nicole, University of Arizona, Banner Medical University Tucson, Tucson, Arizona, United States
  • Yousman, Wina, University of Arizona, Banner Medical University Tucson, Tucson, Arizona, United States
  • Loarte, Pablo, University of Arizona, Banner Medical University Tucson, Tucson, Arizona, United States
  • De Mattos, Angelo M., University of Arizona, Banner Medical University Tucson, Tucson, Arizona, United States
  • Kodali, Lavanya, University of Arizona, Banner Medical University Tucson, Tucson, Arizona, United States
Background

Elderly patients with end stage renal disease account for 22.5% of the adults on kidney transplant waiting list in 2016, a significant rise from 15.3% in 2006. At our institute, deceased donor kidney transplant (DDKT) rate for elderly patients (defined as ≥ 65 years of age) was 33.8% between 2016-2017, much higher than the national rate of 19.2%. The use of kidneys with Kidney Donor Profile Index (KDPI) higher than 85 has facilitated shorter waiting time for this target population. Our objective is to see the outcome of the elderly patients who received high KDPI>85% DDKT.

Methods

Retrospective chart review was done on patients who received deceased kidney transplants from July 2016 to August 2017 at Banner University Medical Center in Tucson, Arizona. Primary outcomes were glomerular filtration fraction (GFR) 1-year post transplant, rejection rate (RR) and delayed graft function (DGF) rate in the elderly who received high KDPI deceased donor kidneys. Data was analyzed using SPSS. GFR is calculated using MDRD.

Results

Among 154 patients who received kidney transplantation at our institute, 52 (33.8%) patients were elderly and 34.6% of them received high KDPI kidneys. Characteristics of our cohort were represented in table 1. The elderly who received high KDPI kidneys have similar rate of DGF, RR, and GFR 1 year post transplant compared to the rest of the cohort (50.0% vs 48.6%, 11.1% vs 18.9%, 47 vs 58 ml/min/1.73m2, all p>0.05). Elderly patients had significantly higher cold ischemic time (CIT) compared to the rest of the cohort (32.4±9.7 vs 27.2±12.5h).

Conclusion

Elderly patients at our institute who received high KDPI kidneys have similar rate of DGF, RR and GFR 1-year post transplant compared to the rest of the cohort. Compared to the national rate, elderly high KDPI recipients in our study have prolonged CIT (32.4±9.7 vs 17.0±8.7) and higher DGF (50% vs 23.8%) but comparable rejection rate (9.5% vs 11.1%) and GFR 1-year post transplant was 47 vs 58 ml/min/1.73m2.